Moment in Time

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  • PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS/MARBLE CLIFF HISTORICAL SOCIETY
    The Arlington Theater, 1800 W. Fifth Ave. near Grandview Heights, was opened June 1, 1935, and was the first theater designed and built by the F&Y Building Service, a firm that also built the Westmont Theater, the Fifth Avenue Theater, the Cleve and the Indianola Theater.
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  • PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS/MARBLE CLIFF HISTORICAL SOCIETY
    Patrolman R.A. Bowshier of the Grandview Heights Police Department is shown in this May 1943 photo next to squad car No. 2, a new Chevrolet sedan. Bowshier got into some trouble in 1949 in an incident involving a chicken.
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  • PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS/MARBLE CLIFF HISTORICAL SOCIETY
    Jessie and Betty Merkle are pictured with their donkey-powered carriage outside their Marble Cliff home in 1912. The two girls were children of William J. and Ada Boyle Merkle, residents of the former Our Lady of Victory convent house at 1539 Roxbury Road.
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  • PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS/MARBLE CLIFF HISTORICAL SOCIETY
    In 1932, the northeast corner of Grandview and Fifth avenues hosted a miniature golf course, built with cinder fairways. Stew Harrison was 34 when he bought the course and erected a 12-by-12-foot building -- the white section with the steeply sloped roof shown in this early 1950s photo -- which he called the Hamburger Construction Co.
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  • PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS/MARBLE CLIFF HISTORICAL SOCIETY
    Officer Tom Hayes of the Columbus Division of Police died in 2011 of injuries suffered when he was shot in the line of duty Dec. 18, 1979. The Grandview Heights High School graduate and Marble Cliff resident designed the Columbus Division of Police Memorial in downtown Columbus.
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  • PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS/MARBLE CLIFF HISTORICAL SOCIETY
    Big Bear's Grandview Heights headquarters and warehouses were marked by a sign that was unmissable for those exiting state Route 315 onto Olentangy River Road. Big Bear went out of business in 2004; Grandview Yard replaced the headquarters.
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  • PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS/MARBLE CLIFF HISTORICAL SOCIETY
    This photo shows the Sohio station at the corner of Third and Grandview avenues. The building was razed in late 2006 to build the Heights of Grandview condominiums.
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  • PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS/MARBLE CLIFF HISTORICAL SOCIETY
    In 1924, the newly organized Grandview Heights Fire Department had become Franklin County's second, after Columbus, to purchase a motorized firefighting apparatus. It was Aug. 8 when the newly acquired Seagrave Engine No. 1 pumped its first water at a fire scene, a grass fire near Goodale and Northwest boulevards. This photograph, provided by Melissa Overly of Granville, shows the Grandview Heights Fire Department's new 1941 Seagrave fire truck, Engine No. 2, which would replace the 1924 Seagrave Suburbanite.
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  • PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS/MARBLE CLIFF HISTORICAL SOCIETY
    Ruth Weinman, seen here as a child, was the daughter of William Weinman, owner of the Weinman Pump Manufacturing Co., and Henrietta Heinmiller Weinman. The couple hired famed architect Frank Packard to build their home in Marble Cliff.
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  • PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS/MARBLE CLIFF HISTORICAL SOCIETY
    Lola Celli, a Grandview resident, disappeared mysteriously in 1946. On Feb. 23, she left to take the First Avenue bus to a store in downtown Columbus and was not seen again. The case remains unsolved.
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  • PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS/MARBLE CLIFF HISTORICAL SOCIETY
    Robert Livingston, often seen on his Harley Davidson motorcycle, was named Grandview's police chief in 1943.
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  • PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS/MARBLE CLIFF HISTORICAL SOCIETY
    This aerial image is looking northeast from the corner of Grandview Avenue (bottom) and McKinley Road (diagonal center). In the center of the image is the Toledo & Central Ohio Railroad roundhouse, built in 1918.
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  • PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS/MARBLE CLIFF HISTORICAL SOCIETY
    The residence at 1122 Fairview Ave. was featured in the Grandview Heights/Marble Cliff Historical Society's Tour of Homes this year. The home was designed by architect John Upton Gribben as his own residence.
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  • PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS/MARBLE CLIFF HISTORICAL SOCIETY
    Robert G. Jones served in the Ohio House of Representatives until his death. In 1969, his widow, Doris Jones, was appointed to replace him, even though she had not served in an elected capacity before. Mrs. Jones is shown here with her children (from left) Lance, Lydia and Grace Ann at their home in Grandview Heights. She also was a member of the Grandview PTA and several civic organizations.
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  • PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS/MARBLE CLIFF HISTORICAL SOCIETY
    This photo shows the Outdoors Store on Dublin Road in the mid-1960s, with a vintage Columbus Public Schools bus parked in front. The store outgrew the space on First Avenue, so in 1955 it was moved to a building on the property next to the Bardens' home. A 1972 fire completely destroyed the building.
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  • PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS/MARBLE CLIFF HISTORICAL SOCIETY
    This 1961 photo shows the children playing in an early November snowstorm in the front yard of the Grandview home of David and Cleo Backus. Cleo Backus related in an interview in 2013, on her 100th birthday, that she bought the home at 1356 Elmwood in 1953.
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  • PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS/MARBLE CLIFF HISTORICAL SOCIETY
    This photo shows a quarry worker using a jackhammer to break up stone so it could be mined and shipped. It was dangerous work, and many men were killed in accidents involving falls, explosions and fires.
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  • PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS/MARBLE CLIFF HISTORICAL SOCIETY
    (From left) Olga Ashelman, Dick Armel and Peggy Clifton were seniors in the 1940 class of Grandview Heights High School, which included 95 students. The three were cheerleaders in the 1938-39 and 1939-40 school years.
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  • PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS/MARBLE CLIFF HISTORICAL SOCIETY
    The Boulevard Theater, 1312 W. Fifth Ave., opened Dec. 21, 1940. This drawing was an architectural pre-production F&Y sketch.
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  • PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS/MARBLE CLIFF HISTORICAL SOCIETY
    The Marble Cliff Quarry began operations in the mid-19th century just west of the Scioto River near what is now Grandview Heights. An engine has its tanks filled with water in this 1956 photo, provided by Galen Gonser and used by permission of columbusrailroads.com.
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  • PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS/MARBLE CLIFF HISTORICAL SOCIETY
    The Brotherhood of the Rook was established in 1915 by male students in Grandview as a social club for boys. They purchased a historic log cabin and moved it to the Bronson property at 1096 Wyandotte Road. Mr. Bronson died in 1920, the property was sold and the new owner declined to rent the property to the club. Worried that they would have to disband without a clubhouse, members developed a plan to build a house. They had the plans reviewed by Ohio State University architect Howard Dwight Smith, who had just designed Ohio Stadium. Early in 1921, the Rook House Co. was incorporated with Lyman Markel as president and Ted Eaton as secretary, with a capital stock of $2,500. George Urlin donated $300 for a lot at 1347 Elmwood Ave., and shares (inset) were sold for as little as $10. Events raised money for building materials, and work teams of students and family members were organized. The foundations were dug, concrete poured, and a building of frame with wood siding and a large fireplace was completed by 1922 (drawing by Bill Arter). In 1961, a new Ohio law prohibited high school fraternities and sororities, and the Rooks lost their official standing. The house was sold in 1965, and the proceeds formed the nucleus of the funds of the Brotherhood of Rooks-Ted J. Eaton Scholarship Foundation, established in 1966. It still funds scholarships for Grandview Heights/Marble Cliff Historical Society students today.
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  • PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS/MARBLE CLIFF HISTORICAL SOCIETY
    In 1939, the W. G. Barnhart Co., 36 E. Gay St. in Columbus, purchased the property fronting Cambridge Boulevard and Arlington Avenue that was part of the Aladdin Country Club. The home in this advertisement was at 1271 Cambridge Blvd.
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  • PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS/MARBLE CLIFF HISTORICAL SOCIETY
    After adding an elephant in 1873, the Sells Brothers Circus became one of the premiere traveling shows in the country, and by 1890 was the second-largest in the country and the largest in the Midwest.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    John Hussey and his wife, Margaret, had two children, Donald and Eleanor, shown here with their cat sitting on the porch of the family home at 1367 Wyandotte Road, built in 1905 as one of the first homes in the Gladdington Heights subdivision.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Designed by architect Edgar Outcalt, who also designed the Grandview Municipal Pool building and the Linden Theater on Cleveland Avenue, this school was informally called the Barracks School, given its history. It contained grades 1-3 in one room, 4-6 in another, and 7-9 in a third. The fourth room was a larger common space used for school activities.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This 1924 photo, taken in a classroom at Grandview High School, shows Irene Hankinson, assistant principal and math teacher at Grandview Junior High School; Milton M.Williams, superintendent of Grandview Heights and Upper Arlington Public Schools; and Grandview students Doris Sutton and Bob Springer, both of whom would graduate in 1928.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This photo from the newspaper article shows Grandview residents Grace Martina and Tony Tedeschi in a pose from the Italian dance La Tarantella. The popular Italian dance, according to an old Italian legend, got its name when a Neapolitan couple was bitten by a tarantula, and the only way to cure the resulting irrepressible desire to dance was to keep right on dancing.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Coming off of two losses and a tie for the previous three games, Grandview played Arlington in the last matchup of the 1942 football season. This photo was taken at the kickoff for the game.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Joseph L. Gaudieri was born in Italy in 1890 to Panfino and Vita Antonia Gaudieri. In 1922, he established a business of his own and in 1925 opened his store at 1629 W. First Ave. (previously Gutches' Market, and later the Celeste Realty office) at First and Oakland avenues in Grandview.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    From 1915-25, the event of the year was the Grandview Heights, Marble Cliff and Upper Arlington Field Day Celebration. The annual holiday activity was held in early summer and featured a parade, food, a baseball game between Grandview and Arlington, children's games and more.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The property at 1117 W. First Ave., at the southeast corner of First Avenue and Oxley Road, now is the home of Health and Harmony Animal Hospital, which replaced the offices of physician Gary Erdy. Long before the existing building rose, a filling station was built, becoming the home of Neff's Texaco, and later Browning's Texaco, shown in this photograph from 1976.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The building at the north end of the Grandview Bank Block at 1305-1307 Grandview Ave. currently is the home to Cameron Mitchell's the Avenue Steak Tavern. When the Bank Block opened in 1927 ...
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This 1872 map of northern Franklin Township shows the property owners of the land between the rivers, which would ultimately become the village of Marble Cliff and later the city of Grandview Heights. The parallel line below the railroad tracks is Dublin Pike, later known as Dublin Road, and King Avenue borders the top of the map. Grandview Avenue would be located running north and south in the center of the map, dividing the Walcutt and Zollinger lands. The Adena Indian Mound (depicted as a radiating circle) was located on the J.R. Anderson property near the bend in the Scioto River, just west of the confluence with the Olentangy River. Note the many quarries adjacent to the river and the spring-fed pools on both sides of the railroad. The Walcutt School is located just north of Dublin Pike at Grandview Avenue. The Thomas Farm at the right would be purchased by the Thompson Brothers for their Northwest Boulevard Co. development, and the farms at the top left would become the southern section of Upper Arlington and First Community Village.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Roderick "RB" Barden was a professor in the Agricultural Extension Service at Ohio State University when he started the Outdoors Store in 1934. He later operated the OSU Airport and ran the aviation department at OSU, and became the chairman of the department of agricultural engineering.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Former resident and 1926 Grandview graduate Frank "Dude" Higgs is shown in 1943 with a wartime worker during a visit to a Curtiss Wright machine shop, which was assembling parts for World War II aircraft. Higgs graduated from Ohio State University and was called up to the Army Air Corps.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This 1962 photo, originally published in the Columbus Citizen-Journal, shows the site preparation and beginning construction phase of First Community Village on the northern boundary of Grandview.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    In 1888, Columbus resident J.R. Anderson sold his farm and adjacent property on Dublin Road just east of Grandview Avenue to W.A. and Clara Pope, who maintained their farm there until the 1930s. On land just to the west of the farmhouse -- shown in this 1892 photo -- was an ancient Indian mound, dating from 400 B.C. Constructed by the Adena Indians as a ceremonial burial ground, the mound was more than 20 feet high and between 150 and 200 feet in diameter. The mound was identified in early archaeology records as the Anderson Mound, and had been carefully preserved by Mr. Anderson. Pope also actively preserved the integrity of the mound, and constructed stairs to the top, where he installed a pergola for he and his family to enjoy the view over the river valley. After his death, Clara and her daughter, Florence, moved to Santa Monica, and a decade later sold the property to Columbus car dealer Joe Toepfner. Toepfner wanted to clear the land for development, and after a prolonged battle with Grandview residents and the Ohio Historical Society, the mound was excavated and cleared in 1954.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    One of the keys to the development of the Grandview Heights, Marble Cliff and Arlington communities was the completion of the trolley line from downtown to the Tri-Village area. The trolley traveled from downtown, up what is now Goodale Boulevard, up the Broadview Hill, west on First Avenue, and north on Arlington Avenue to Fifth Avenue. Here is an excerpt from a 1908 publication, "The Homebuilder": "... the run from Grandview Heights to the center of the city (Columbus) takes less than 20 minutes. The cars on the line are among the best in the service of the Columbus Railway and Light Company. The fare is five cents, with transfers to any part of the city, on any of the other lines operated by the Company." The publication also touts the completion of Goodale Boulevard as an important part of opening the region to transportation. Goodale was built in 1907 for $12,000 using crushed stone from the quarries, and was paid for by private funds from large property owners in Grandview.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The Grandview PTA met on the east lawn of the Willits H. Sawyer residence, 1499 Roxbury Road, on Wednesday, May 15, 1918. The Sawyer home was on the bluff, overlooking the Scioto River, near the intersection of Roxbury Road and Cardigan Avenue. Parents and children at the event included Grandview and Upper Arlington residents. Until Upper Arlington opened its school system in October 1918, children in the community attended Grandview schools. The meeting consisted of a reception and business meeting, as well as a series of presentations on the lawn given by classes from the school, the Camp Fire Girls (foreground, in Indian costumes), and the Boy Scouts. Mrs. Sawyer was active in the National Congress of Mothers and PTA, and was president of the Ohio branch. Mr. Sawyer was an internationally known consulting engineer and vice president of the E.W. Clark and Co. Management Corp. in Columbus.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This seven-room brick home at 1237 W. First Ave. in Grandview Heights was advertised for sale in the November 1918 issue of "Norwester" magazine.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This 1917 photo shows the choir standing at the front of the chapel
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    View looking west on First Avenue at the triangular intersection of First and Virginia.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The Dublin Road Water Treatment Plant is shown in the center of this photo.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Marble Cliff resident Emily Moelchert is shown in this photo with two docile Brown Swiss cows in a field down the hill from her home near Roxbury Road and Cardigan Avenue. Emily was the daughter of Charlotte Wilkinson, who built the family home at 1964 Cardigan Ave. in 1913. Charlotte was a widow who moved to Columbus from Ironton with her four children so they could attend Ohio State University. Her husband, a West Point graduate, died while serving during the Indian wars in the western United States in the latter part of the 19th century. Emily married Chester Moelchert, and they resided in the home for 70 years. The cows were owned by the Willits Sawyer family, who lived on a three-acre estate at 1499 Roxbury Road, which comprised the entire western portion of Roxbury between Cardigan and Third Avenue. Sawyer provided fresh dairy products to local residents.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    In 1916, brothers King and Ben Thompson, who eventually were responsible for the early planning of Upper Arlington, established the Northwest Boulevard Co. to realize a dream of developing a community similar to one they had visited in Kansas City. The plats of their Northwest Boulevard subdivision were filed in 1916 and 1917 and included properties carved out of the 345-acre Grandview Thomas farm. Northwest Boulevard was seen as a crucial step in the development, providing a convenient route from Upper Arlington directly to downtown Columbus. This photograph, captioned "The Skyline of Good Old Columbus Town, Taken from the Knolls of The Northwest Boulevard," appeared on the inside cover of the October 1918 "Norwester" magazine. It was part of an advertisement for residential lots for sale by the Thompsons' company. Ben was president of the company and King was secretary. The advertisement boasted that, "as the crow flies, the Ohio Statehouse was less than two miles away from the development." The skyline of "good old Columbus town" in 1918 was indeed a modest skyline, and this undeveloped part of Grandview was poised for significant changes to follow.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This photo shows the cover of a piano manual for one of his designed-for-the-home upright pianos, which sold for about $250 and was shipped directly to the purchaser at no charge.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The Upper Arlington Co., owned by brothers King and Ben Thompson, set out to develop a planned community just north of what was then Arlington (now Marble Cliff) on the Miller farmland in 1915. The formal entrance to the new community was at the corner of Fifth Avenue and Cambridge Boulevard. The top photo in this composite shows the entry, with the stone fence and columns, the newly constructed road and curbs, and light posts and sidewalks. The bottom photo, taken three years later in 1918, shows the same entry with newly constructed homes on both sides of Cambridge. Development was interrupted in 1916 when National Guard troops, preparing to participate in the protection of the U.S./Mexico border, used the site as a training camp, known as Camp Willis. UA was incorporated in March 1918.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This sequence of images shows the many faces of Presutti's Restaurant over the years.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This photo shows the construction of the Scioto River Pumping Station.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    In this photo, a locomotive of the Pennsylvania Railroad crosses the Scioto River at the western edge of Marble Cliff.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Ada Boyle
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Drawings for a patent for a movie theater with a single projection system.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Before and after: the Smiling Scot Wholesale Showroom (top photo, from a 1962 publicity postcard), managed by Don Gump and his wife, Dotty, was located at the corner of Goodale Boulevard and Palmer Road in Grandview. The building, on land originally part of the Northwest Boulevard Co. subdivision, was owned by Ohio Laboratories Inc., suppliers of home-cleaning products and general housewares. Smiling Scot was originally trademarked in 1936, and the Gumps established it as a wholesale outlet. It it became a popular place to purchase items that were out of the ordinary, and local residents frequented the showroom for unique collectibles and gifts. A classified ad in the January 1959 Popular Mechanics magazine solicited sales agents for the company. The ad stated: "Agents Wanted: Fabulous Money Makers. Fast-selling dish cloths. 500 other popular articles. Lowest wholesale prices. Smiling Scot DP3 1266 Goodale, Columbus 8, Ohio." The building still stands and now is occupied by Metro Industries. Incorporated in 1966, Metro Industries is a family-owned fastener and industrial distributor.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This structure was designed in 1905 by J. Upton Gribben, a noted Columbus architect and former protege of Frank Packard.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    View of Fifth Avenue toward Dublin Road.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Pictured in this 1979 photo are 14 second-, third- and fourth-year French students from Grandview Heights High School.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This composite shows ads for the Pope-Toledo (left) and the Frayer-Miller limousine body (right) from 1906.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Grandview Heights High School Marching Band
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Oswald Hering (1874-1941) was a noted New York architect and author.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This French-style mansion, seen from the garden (top) and entrance, is located at 1599 Roxbury Road.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This 1897 photo from the Massachusetts State Archives shows Casparis astride a horse during construction of the Nashua (later renamed Wachusett) Aqueduct.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Pictured here are the mayor and his wife inspecting the new sign as it's installed at the park.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Pictured are Cindy Wilson, Gregg Scholairet, Debbie Rings, Peggy Such and Erni Kreil as they pick up the beat.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Mrs. Ross Murphree (left), Grandview PTA health and safety chairman, Carla Furness, captain of the safety patrol of Stevenson Elementary School and Mayor Joseph Wyman.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Pictured here are Jim Noble, jumping, with Wilbur Biemesderfer, Chuck Mattews and Harry McCabe watching. Victories were scored over Circleville, London, Franklin Heights, St. Charles and Hilliard. Losses were to Bexley, North and Worthington.
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    The Wyandotte Pharmacy soda fountain.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Pictured here is President Richard Nixon as he leaves the memorial service, watched over carefully by then Grandview Police Chief Keith Armentrout and Nixon's own security personnel.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The members of "Batteries Not Included" pictured here are (front) senior Joe Swary, (standing, from left) freshman Dan Marshall and junior Mike Burkey and (in tree) junior Andris Bjornson. Quintet member Ian Kaufman is not pictured.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Jimmy Massey, a baker, open Romeo's with his friend, Romeo Sirij.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Kicking off each summer in the 1950s were swimming pool activities, featuring bathing beauties such as these pictured here at the Grandview pool.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Denison Engineering Co. and an advertisement for its HydrOILics line of hydraulic presses it manufactured for both military and civilian aircraft.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This 1958 aerial photo shows the newly completed Spring-Sandusky interchange, which joined state Route 315, U.S. Route 33 and Spring Street and Sandusky Avenue.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This postcard, from the Columbus Public Library collection, was mailed from Columbus to a couple in Greenville in January 1913.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    President Helen Motz, pictured here in the front row (fifth from the left).
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This photograph shows a locomotive of the Pennsylvania Railroad -- first known in this area as the Columbus, Chicago, Indianapolis Central Railroad -- traveling south near the village of Marble Cliff.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The Grandview Heights High School cross-country team was led by captains Jerry Guy, Al Roberts and Steve DeCarlo.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The Grandview Theater
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Pictured here in the Highlander is the Grandview Girls Athletic Association membership for 1930.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    In the early days of the Great Depression, circa 1930, patent medicine and cosmetics were sold by the H. T. Maloney Co.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    In 1977, with the original recipes pictured here, the French Loaf Bakery was opened and operated using directions for the beating and baking of bread.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The Lookout House restaurant
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    On a rainy March afternoon in 1965, seven students started a week-long visit to Cold Springs Harbor High School on Long Island, N.Y. The exchange students were Kelly Kahler, Jill Smith, Dave Royer, Kathy Flanagan, Donna Sheets, Tim Murphy and Ray Stegmeier.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The diploma pictured here is the oldest diploma in the historical society's archives. (Anna's photo is inset.) It was donated to the society by the Paddock heirs.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    George Eagle started a chocolate business in Columbus in 1919. The business originally operated out of Eagle's townhouse located behind the Columbus Dispatch building. In 1937, George and his wife, Elsie Eagle, opened a store on West Fifth Avenue, and in 1939 moved they into a home next door at 1943 W. Fifth Ave. At various times, Eagle Candy stores operated in locations downtown, at the Kingsdale Shopping Center, near campus and in Clintonville. This photo shows the crowds lining up in front of the Eagles Homemade Candies store on West Fifth Avenue during the Christmas season sometime in the 1940s to get their hands on the wonderful candy sold there. There were often so many people lined up in front of the store that a security guard was hired to control the crowds. The Eagles' home is next door to the right of the store, and at the far left is a vacant lot where Trinity United Methodist Church later would be built. In November 1972, the store was purchased by Thomas Zanetos and reopened as Anthony-Thomas Candy. The Eagle Candy store in Clintonville still operates within the Eagle family.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Clarence Salzgaber (inset), living on his farm with his wife and family, was one of the 126 "truck farmers" in Franklin County. These farmers harvested more than 2,000 acres, producing fresh vegetables for the Columbus area. Salzgaber, a Grandview Heights resident, was president of the Columbus Vegetable Growers Association. His home still stands on the northeast corner of Grandview and First avenues.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    John W. Bricker
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    he new structure replaced the old house at 1318 Fernwood Avenue (inset).
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Our Lady of Victory Catholic Church parish raised money to fulfill the building of the new Parish Life Center (shown here), dedicated April 9, 2005.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Pictured are (from left): Lane Benadum, Bob Andrews, Milton Johnson, Jim Renz and Jim Gilchrist.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The Christmas tree-lighting ceremony was established in Grandview Heights in 1976, as was the holiday visit from Santa Claus.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    In 1976, Grandview City Councilman Everett Daniels confessed his "secret desire" for Grandview Heights to have its own Christmas tree. That year, city maintenance workers carried out his idea. A 25-foot Austrian fir, located on park property along Goodale Boulevard just west of Grandview Avenue, was cut down and taken to Pierce Field, where it was erected and stabilized with guy wires. Under the direction of Parks and Recreation Director Lynn Veach (pictured to the right of Daniels), the tree was decorated with Christmas ornaments made by students of Grandview's Stevenson and Edison elementary schools. The city's official lighting ceremony followed, and Grandview Heights had its first Christmas tree.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    From left to right are team players Allen Nunn, Pat Mathias, Herman Benedetto and Nick DeLuca.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The head coach of the team was Larry Larson (pictured), who was named Coach of the Year by the Columbus Citizen Journal and Co-Coach of the Year by the Associated Press for District AA.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This picture may be found on the historical society's new timeline at ghpl.org/timeline.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This photograph, from the Esther Koch Evans collection, shows Grandview elementary schoolers dressed as Pilgrims and Indians standing in front of the Grandview Public School (the current Edison Intermediate School) with their teacher, possibly in the 1920s.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Pictured are (from left): City Engineer Robert G. Wolfe and student counterpart Mardi Fuller; Councilman Joe Arganbright and John Karlevec; Councilman Larry Pierce and Bruce Williams; and student Tom McCoy with Councilman George Anderson.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The 25th annual homecoming assembly and football game were two exciting events of the Grandview Heights High School students' year in 1954. ... Pictured (from left) are Mimi Jones, Carol Sue Herd, Queen Joyce Bach, Desire Chester and Diane Cashey.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The 1976 Grandview Halloween Street Festival was held Saturday, Oct. 30.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Standing in the picture of the officers elected are Grandview Mayor Joseph Wyman; Treasurer Virginia Abbott; and Councilwoman Ann Larrick, secretary. Seated are Dirk Voelker, vice president; and Win Keller, president.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The facelift of Grandview Avenue at the Bank Block was underway in 1977, with the installation of the framework for an orange-striped canopy.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Two golfers pose for a photo at the annual tournament at the then Arlington Country Club in 1917.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    In 1924, Dr. Clayton Smith (right) was a member of the faculty of medicine at Ohio State University and was a professor of physiological chemistry. He also was the school physician for Grandview Heights High School. Marie McElwee, pictured alongside Smith, was the school nurse. A graduate of White Cross Hospital, McElwee performed various tests on the students' eyes, ears, noses and throats; gave physical examinations; and made house calls on students who were ill. Smith prescribed on the cases of a more-serious nature. McElwee was a member of the staff of Grandview Heights High School, while Smith was the acting physician who aided McElwee in her work and offered his services free of charge. Their efforts were considered "invaluable and most efficient in every detail," according to the 1924 Grandview Heights High School yearbook.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    On May 4, 1920, Standard Oil purchased the property at the corner of West Fifth Avenue and Cambridge Boulevard, and Marble Cliff then had the first "filling station" in the area.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Ralph Guglielmi, pictured here with his legendary coach Frank Leahy, rose to stardom overnight and made headlines nationally with his spectacular passing.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This aerial view of the confluence of the Scioto and Olentangy rivers just south of Grandview Heights was taken in 1949 by famous Dayton photographer William Preston Mayfield. Mayfield was the personal photographer to the Wright Brothers, and at 14 years of age in 1910 was the first person in the nation to take a photograph from an airplane. The photo is looking directly east over Grandview Avenue at the bottom, toward the Columbus skyline at the top. A working quarry is at the right center, flanked on the right by the west yard of the railroad at Mckinley Avenue, and to the left by a vacated, water-filled quarry. The tower of WBNS-TV is at the top left, just to the right of the railroad siding and bridge south of Goodale Boulevard and above the water-treatment plant on Dublin Road, which curves through the left portion of the photo. This entire area is now dominated by the interchanges of Interstate 670 at Grandview Avenue. The quarry at the bottom is now the location of the Arbors of Watermark apartment complex. This photo is used courtesy of the Special Collections and Archives at Wright State University.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Ninety-one seniors, their parents and guests gathered in the new auditorium of the Grandview Heights High School for commencement exercises June 10, 1958. The class president and several high-ranking seniors spoke. The Rev. John R. Glenn gave the invocation and the benediction, and the high school mixed chorus, under the direction of Mrs. Betty Roberts, sang several selections. Ralph Berry, the high school principal, introduced the senior class and board member Dr. Tom Lewis awarded the diplomas. The program ended with the singing of the alma mater and the benediction. Following commencement exercises, the graduates boarded buses headed for Buckeye Lake where a buffet dinner was served, followed by dancing in the Crystal Ballroom. A swim took place in the Crystal pool, and rides and the miniature-golf course were open for the seniors' enjoyment. From 3:30 to 5:30 a.m., the class took a sunrise boat ride on the J.B. Taylor, the 300-passenger, triple-deck boat with music for dancing provided. Breakfast was waiting in the Crystal ballroom when the boat returned. The senior officers with parents and the class adviser, Fred Robinson, planned all the senior-night activities. Pictured here are commencement speakers: Fred Snyder, class president; Lucille Bryson; Ann Tuttle; Sharon Riggs; and Rusty Lawyer as they look over their speech notes.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Referred to as the "Bobcat Mentor," James Scott was Grandview Heights' football coach in 1938.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The first-year coach of the Grandview tennis team Bill McGhee, pictured here, instructs tennis captain Kim Keller on how to make a better approach for a winning shot. The senior captain led his tennis team to the school's first winning season since 1961.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This 1967 photograph shows the double-span metal truss bridge over the Scioto River near the intersection of Grandview Avenue and McKinley Road; the inset photo at the bottom left is an aerial view of where the bridge crossed the river. On the south side of the bridge was the Columbus West Yard of the Toledo & Ohio Central Rail Road. The yard, located at the location of the current COTA bus garage, was very active, and the number of trains entering and leaving the yard often tied up traffic on both sides of the bridge. Residents have written that they had plenty of time to watch the operation of the railroad roundhouse while waiting to cross the bridge. Traffic was impacted all along Grandview Avenue to the north as cars waited for the switch engines to clear the crossing.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This original photograph was taken Oct. 3, 1930, and depicts the clients of tailor Harris Berger of Queens, N.Y., as they play mini-golf while their suits are pressed.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Carl Hoster was part of the famous German Village brewing business started by his grandfather, Louis Hoster. Carl lived in Marble Cliff on Arlington Avenue across from the Arlington Country Club. In 1906, when the above photo was taken, he was president of the Hoster Columbus Associated Brewers, which was in business until Prohibition. An article in the April 15, 1906, Columbus Dispatch indicated Carl purchased two new automobiles: a 1906 Fiat for $9,000 (about $237,000 in today's dollars) and a Pope-Toledo (bottom drawing). Three other residents -- Samuel Prescott Bush, Eugene Gray and Theodore Lindenberg -- also bought Pope-Toledo cars that year. A later edition of the Dispatch reported that Hoster was arrested by the Marble Cliff marshal, who was on horseback, for speeding through the village in his roadster.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Pictured here is the advertisement for the senior play, one of the many school activities that year.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Pictured are (from left) Alice Rene, Jean Kidwell, Marilyn Salzgaber and Nona Toops, members of the Sigma Omega Epsilon sorority as they work to raise funds for the 1948 Red Cross fund campaign.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Head lifeguard Teri Antolino dives from the high board while Mayor Larry Pierce and Congressman Chalmers Wylie cut the ribbon for the official opening of the Grandview pool June 3, 1978. The city had purchased the privately owned Grandview Swim Club at 1305 Goodale Blvd. The former clubhouse and pool were improved as part of a $470,000 renovation project. Pierce said it was the biggest single project the city had undertaken. It was funded with federal and municipal money. While the basic building remained the same as it was in the early 1930s, the new shape of the pool, with a deeper diving area, fresh paint and a new stainless-steel shell, gave the municipally owned pool a new look. To many residents, the pool remains the place of summer memories in Grandview Heights.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    (From left): Judi Ervin, Cindy Pinney, Donna Tyndale, Patti Long, and Carol Meyer, who served as head majorette. This photo also appeared in the 1974 Highlander yearbook for Grandview Heights High School.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Pictured here is Marta Durban, instructor for one of the new 1977 programs sponsored by the Grandview Heights Parks and Recreation Department. Under her direction, dance clinics were held for all ages in creative movement, modern dance and modern jazz. Community recreational needs continue to be provided through the Parks and Recreation Department and the Grandview Center.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    In 1976, the Grandview Heights/Marble Cliff Historical Society had a project for the country's bicentennial. It seemed like a natural theme to capture the stories of the historic homes of the community.
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