Moment in Time

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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Pictured are (from left): City Engineer Robert G. Wolfe and student counterpart Mardi Fuller; Councilman Joe Arganbright and John Karlevec; Councilman Larry Pierce and Bruce Williams; and student Tom McCoy with Councilman George Anderson.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The 25th annual homecoming assembly and football game were two exciting events of the Grandview Heights High School students' year in 1954. ... Pictured (from left) are Mimi Jones, Carol Sue Herd, Queen Joyce Bach, Desire Chester and Diane Cashey.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The 1976 Grandview Halloween Street Festival was held Saturday, Oct. 30.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Standing in the picture of the officers elected are Grandview Mayor Joseph Wyman; Treasurer Virginia Abbott; and Councilwoman Ann Larrick, secretary. Seated are Dirk Voelker, vice president; and Win Keller, president.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The facelift of Grandview Avenue at the Bank Block was underway in 1977, with the installation of the framework for an orange-striped canopy.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Two golfers pose for a photo at the annual tournament at the then Arlington Country Club in 1917.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    In 1924, Dr. Clayton Smith (right) was a member of the faculty of medicine at Ohio State University and was a professor of physiological chemistry. He also was the school physician for Grandview Heights High School. Marie McElwee, pictured alongside Smith, was the school nurse. A graduate of White Cross Hospital, McElwee performed various tests on the students' eyes, ears, noses and throats; gave physical examinations; and made house calls on students who were ill. Smith prescribed on the cases of a more-serious nature. McElwee was a member of the staff of Grandview Heights High School, while Smith was the acting physician who aided McElwee in her work and offered his services free of charge. Their efforts were considered "invaluable and most efficient in every detail," according to the 1924 Grandview Heights High School yearbook.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    On May 4, 1920, Standard Oil purchased the property at the corner of West Fifth Avenue and Cambridge Boulevard, and Marble Cliff then had the first "filling station" in the area.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Ralph Guglielmi, pictured here with his legendary coach Frank Leahy, rose to stardom overnight and made headlines nationally with his spectacular passing.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This aerial view of the confluence of the Scioto and Olentangy rivers just south of Grandview Heights was taken in 1949 by famous Dayton photographer William Preston Mayfield. Mayfield was the personal photographer to the Wright Brothers, and at 14 years of age in 1910 was the first person in the nation to take a photograph from an airplane. The photo is looking directly east over Grandview Avenue at the bottom, toward the Columbus skyline at the top. A working quarry is at the right center, flanked on the right by the west yard of the railroad at Mckinley Avenue, and to the left by a vacated, water-filled quarry. The tower of WBNS-TV is at the top left, just to the right of the railroad siding and bridge south of Goodale Boulevard and above the water-treatment plant on Dublin Road, which curves through the left portion of the photo. This entire area is now dominated by the interchanges of Interstate 670 at Grandview Avenue. The quarry at the bottom is now the location of the Arbors of Watermark apartment complex. This photo is used courtesy of the Special Collections and Archives at Wright State University.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Ninety-one seniors, their parents and guests gathered in the new auditorium of the Grandview Heights High School for commencement exercises June 10, 1958. The class president and several high-ranking seniors spoke. The Rev. John R. Glenn gave the invocation and the benediction, and the high school mixed chorus, under the direction of Mrs. Betty Roberts, sang several selections. Ralph Berry, the high school principal, introduced the senior class and board member Dr. Tom Lewis awarded the diplomas. The program ended with the singing of the alma mater and the benediction. Following commencement exercises, the graduates boarded buses headed for Buckeye Lake where a buffet dinner was served, followed by dancing in the Crystal Ballroom. A swim took place in the Crystal pool, and rides and the miniature-golf course were open for the seniors' enjoyment. From 3:30 to 5:30 a.m., the class took a sunrise boat ride on the J.B. Taylor, the 300-passenger, triple-deck boat with music for dancing provided. Breakfast was waiting in the Crystal ballroom when the boat returned. The senior officers with parents and the class adviser, Fred Robinson, planned all the senior-night activities. Pictured here are commencement speakers: Fred Snyder, class president; Lucille Bryson; Ann Tuttle; Sharon Riggs; and Rusty Lawyer as they look over their speech notes.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Referred to as the "Bobcat Mentor," James Scott was Grandview Heights' football coach in 1938.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The first-year coach of the Grandview tennis team Bill McGhee, pictured here, instructs tennis captain Kim Keller on how to make a better approach for a winning shot. The senior captain led his tennis team to the school's first winning season since 1961.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This 1967 photograph shows the double-span metal truss bridge over the Scioto River near the intersection of Grandview Avenue and McKinley Road; the inset photo at the bottom left is an aerial view of where the bridge crossed the river. On the south side of the bridge was the Columbus West Yard of the Toledo & Ohio Central Rail Road. The yard, located at the location of the current COTA bus garage, was very active, and the number of trains entering and leaving the yard often tied up traffic on both sides of the bridge. Residents have written that they had plenty of time to watch the operation of the railroad roundhouse while waiting to cross the bridge. Traffic was impacted all along Grandview Avenue to the north as cars waited for the switch engines to clear the crossing.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This original photograph was taken Oct. 3, 1930, and depicts the clients of tailor Harris Berger of Queens, N.Y., as they play mini-golf while their suits are pressed.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Carl Hoster was part of the famous German Village brewing business started by his grandfather, Louis Hoster. Carl lived in Marble Cliff on Arlington Avenue across from the Arlington Country Club. In 1906, when the above photo was taken, he was president of the Hoster Columbus Associated Brewers, which was in business until Prohibition. An article in the April 15, 1906, Columbus Dispatch indicated Carl purchased two new automobiles: a 1906 Fiat for $9,000 (about $237,000 in today's dollars) and a Pope-Toledo (bottom drawing). Three other residents -- Samuel Prescott Bush, Eugene Gray and Theodore Lindenberg -- also bought Pope-Toledo cars that year. A later edition of the Dispatch reported that Hoster was arrested by the Marble Cliff marshal, who was on horseback, for speeding through the village in his roadster.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Pictured here is the advertisement for the senior play, one of the many school activities that year.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Sigma Omega Epsilon sorority was formed in Grandview at the end of the 1940s.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Head lifeguard Teri Antolino dives from the high board while Mayor Larry Pierce and Congressman Chalmers Wylie cut the ribbon for the official opening of the Grandview pool June 3, 1978. The city had purchased the privately owned Grandview Swim Club at 1305 Goodale Blvd. The former clubhouse and pool were improved as part of a $470,000 renovation project. Pierce said it was the biggest single project the city had undertaken. It was funded with federal and municipal money. While the basic building remained the same as it was in the early 1930s, the new shape of the pool, with a deeper diving area, fresh paint and a new stainless-steel shell, gave the municipally owned pool a new look. To many residents, the pool remains the place of summer memories in Grandview Heights.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    (From left): Judi Ervin, Cindy Pinney, Donna Tyndale, Patti Long, and Carol Meyer, who served as head majorette. This photo also appeared in the 1974 Highlander yearbook for Grandview Heights High School.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Pictured here is Marta Durban, instructor for one of the new 1977 programs sponsored by the Grandview Heights Parks and Recreation Department. Under her direction, dance clinics were held for all ages in creative movement, modern dance and modern jazz. Community recreational needs continue to be provided through the Parks and Recreation Department and the Grandview Center.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    In 1976, the Grandview Heights/Marble Cliff Historical Society had a project for the country's bicentennial. It seemed like a natural theme to capture the stories of the historic homes of the community.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The GH/MC Historical Society members Claudine France, Margaret Gaudieri, Eleanor Boardman Ann Larrick and Win Keller (inset) ride in their car in the parade of 1976.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The New York World's Fair of 1964 was the destination of these First Community Church youth. The eager travelers were (from left): row one-Karen Wheeler; row two-Karen Beardsley, Karen Kight, Mike McNeal, Cindy Cook and Nancy Priest.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    As their Grandview Heights city beautification project in 1977, Grandview Garden Club members take on the planting at the city's municipal building property.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Councilman Ralph Salzgaber (inset), bicentennial committee chairman for Grandview Heights, proudly displayed the 270-pound Liberty Bell replica ordered for the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff bicentennial celebration.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Paul Panzera was moving in March 1979 to a new location on West Fifth Avenue when he was interviewed by Jane Fitting for the Tri-Village News.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    A group of sportsmen prepare for a round of trap shooting, while another group awaits a turn, at the Columbus (Arlington) Gun Club. This structure was designed in 1905 by J. Upton Gribben, a noted Columbus architect and former protege of Frank Packard. It served as the center of social activity for prominent residents of the area, as skeet shooting was a national passion during this time. The Gun Club was located on the north side of Fifth Avenue between Arlington Avenue and Cambridge Boulevard until the Northwest Boulevard Co. began the development of the Country Club District in 1915, which was the first development in what would become Upper Arlington. At that time, the club moved to a new building on the north side of King Avenue at Andover. The club was the site of the Grand American Handicap Trap Shoot in 1908, and attracted famous shooters such as Annie Oakley (top inset) and John Philip Sousa (bottom inset). It is reported in the book "History of Upper Arlington" that an all-wood motordrome, for use in racing motorcycles, was located on the Gun Club property. The building (front view in upper left inset) was used as the field office for the Northwest Boulevard Co. after the club moved, and the Armstrong family, some of the earliest UA residents, lived in the second-floor rooms.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    1944 W. First Ave.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This circa 1900 photo shows workers in a quarry near Dublin Pike and Grandview Avenue. Most of the workers in the local quarries were Italian immigrants and lived in the "Italian Settlement" near Glenn and Fifth in Grandview.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Pictured here are Mrs. Frank Paulsen, chairwoman of the sale, and Mrs. Albert Weller Jr. as they prepare books for the upcoming event held at the church.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Pictured are (from left): row one-Bruce Behmer, Susan Jeffers, Rose Nardone, Miriam Koch, France Nesbitt, Robert Ulrich, Paul Clark, Benny Nardone, Bruce Frey, John North; row two-Lee Shaffmaster, Amor Bues, Summer Henderson, Bryon Droke, Antoinette Nardone, Donald Franz, Howard Clark and Mrs. Taylor.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Pictured here are (from left): row one-Joan Ritter, Jack Kirkwood, Jeanne Patterson, Marston Wentworth, Margaret Baldwin, Tom Miller, Peggy Davis; row two-Lloyd Gilbert, Bob Wells, Harry Mauger, Bob Scanland and Ralph Lawson.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The 1914 Grandview High School girls basketball team.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This is a circa-1900 photograph of the covered wooden bridge that spanned the Scioto River, linking Upper Arlington to the quarries on the west side of the river.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This poster is from the Grandview Garden Club's celebration of the country's bicentennial in 1976.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    "White is the snow, crisp is the day, and all is fun in a tinkling sleigh." Robert Jones, Norman Brown, John Bogen and William Connor provide the manpower for the sleigh ride carrying Theodora Hannus, Jacqueline Soule, Mary Anderson, Sue Burghalter and Juanita Thompson, all Grandview Heights High School seniors having fun during the winter of 1949. This picture and quote were taken from the 1949 Highlander yearbook, which was dedicated to the residents of Grandview Heights "who have always stood squarely behind our schools." With enthusiasm as their keynote, the class of 1949 Boosters was composed of the entire student body. They planned and carried out assemblies, Club Tropicabana (the winter dance) and the April talent show, and conducted the annual magazine campaign. The redecorated school building of 1948-49 inspired a new format for the 1949 Highlander, and co-editors Sylvia Edmundson, Norman Brown and the rest of the staff worked tirelessly to create the new look for the yearbook.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The Grandview Heights Public Library will celebrate its 90th anniversary this year.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Julius F. Stone's home at 1065 Westwood Ave.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    A former appliance store on Olentangy River Road at Third Avenue near Grandview became the new home of Warner Communication's QUBE interactive television effort in 1977.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The third-graders pictured here in 1915 are (from left): row one-Margaret Zollinger, Leola Baum, Dorothy Adams, Janet Marter, Myrtle Penn, Edna Waterman, Doris Raines, Frances Ward, Burley Biillingsly; row two-Franz Stone, Donald Beach, Melvin Shrumb, Theodore Roberts, Harry Walcott, Henry Master, William Linn, Edmund Dwyer and Horace Smith.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The homecoming crowd at Ohio Stadium on Nov. 23, 1940, watched as Michigan played Ohio State.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Bobcat Boosters tickets.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Trying for first bat in the girls softball game are (bottom) Barbara Peters from the east playground and Jean Jones from the west playground, with Sue Southland, Bonnie Glover, Patty Behmer, Marlene Neher, Joan Utley and Janet Cochran looking on. The winning ball team received a watermelon; other winners received ice cream bars.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    "For the second time Grandview holds the county title," read a quote from a Columbus Dispatch article, referring to the Grandview Heights girls basketball team of 1923. The team went on to play in the Cincinnati tournament, disposing of tournament favorite Hughes High School, only to lose to "a team of lesser quality," Franklin High School. The Cincinnati Community News reported that the Grandview team was regarded as the "dark horse" and the captain of the team, Marie Grubb, appeared at the tournament carrying a toy black horse. Pictured here are team captain Marie Grubb and her team: Doris Rains, Frances Ward, Lucille Hoferkamp, Ruth Walters, Marguerite Droke, Tracy Julian, Dorothy Adams, Annabelle Ward, Ruth Semans and coach Ira Adams. This picture appears in the second annual yearbook of Grandview Heights High School, published in 1923.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The Kiddie Korral at the Pierce Field playground.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Accounts of the storm of Aug. 3, 1987, ran high. Mayor David Dudley declared a state of emergency. Every department head was on hand and the service department called out every available person.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Cheerleaders Debbie Scono, Mimi Little, Amy Keller, Vicki Nobilucci, Mary Daley and Sherry Render.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Miles Elmers (inset) is pictured with his son, Kirwan, in a 1964 photo as they talk with a prospective buyer of one of their custom-built motor homes. It was in the 1950s, as he traveled the United States to promote a variety of products, that he developed a low-sudsing laundry detergent for washing machines. Business boomed and so did Miles' interest in motor homes. He was instrumental in developing the first commercially converted motor home in 1952. After selling his famous All brand soap to Monsanto Corp., Miles was able to turn his attention full time to mobile-home travel. He purchased the land cruiser division of the Flexible Co., a bus manufacturer in Loudonville, and with Kirwan formed the Custom Coach Corp. This first company to specialize in custom-built motor-home conversions of bus shells introduced a new style of travel to the RV industry. The company attracted a who's who of clients with the luxury innovations it developed. Music celebrities took notice of the company's vehicles for travel, which led to other entertainers also becoming customers. Commercial customers included McDonald's founder Ray Kroc, Dave Thomas of Wendy's fame and August Busch lll, CEO of Anheuser-Busch. In 1963, Kirwan attended a weekend gathering of "house car" owners who voted to form the Family Motor Coach Association. This organization is celebrating its golden anniversary and in August inducted Kirwan Elmers, a charter member, into the RV/MH Hall of Fame in Elkhart, Ind. The Custom Coach Corp. formerly was located at 1400 Dublin Road in Marble Cliff.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The first Big Bear store opend in Grandview in 1934.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This photograph, taken in 1984 by a Columbus Citizen Journal photographer, shows the construction of what would be the home of the Columbus Mineshaft Restaurant.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Carolyn Ritter, drum major for the 1952-53 Grandview Heights High School marching band, is pictured here as she leads the band onto the field at the high school stadium. A sea of blue and white marching band members entertained the spectators with their spirited music, fancy dance steps and intricate formations, led by director J.W. Byrnes. The band's skillful performance was the result of many hours of practice from the time of summer band camp to the last game of the season. Their maneuvers were enhanced by the performance of Ritter and seven other majorettes. The formations included a salute to music, a salute to the school and spectators, and the Loyalty song, "We're loyal to you Grandview High."
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Joe Melaragno and his son, Gene, are pictured in front of the stone they quarried.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The State Fairgrounds Coliseum was the scene of the district championship basketball game in 1937.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Boulevard Presbyterian Church's Casavant pipe organ. The organ has been in the church sanctuary at 1235 Northwest Blvd., since December 1965.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Grandview High School had its own heroine in fall 1947 when Diana Gonser investigated the smell of smoke in the school just after 5 p.m. one afternoon. Diana was working in the Bobcat Room where the school newspaper was published when she smelled something unusual. She went to the door of the auditorium and saw smoke coming from the stage curtains and scenery. She ran to the front of the school just as the football coach Charles Thackara and four members of his squad were crossing the street from practice. The players (Jack Roth, Jack Shere, Larry Conaway and Richard Poulton) answered Diana's alert by grabbing fire extinguishers and fighting the flames while Thackara called the Grandview Fire Department. By the time firefighters arrived, the flames were under control with minimum damage. Ralph Berry, the school principal, said the five fire extinguishers that hung in the auditorium were well used by the four youths. No time was lost as the students saved the school from severe damage. Fire Chief Ray Starner investigated the blaze, which he believed originated in a waste basket. Diana shows where she discovered the fire in this photo. The original article in the Columbus Dispatch was taken from the scrapbook of Jeanne Jones Holder.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    War ration books were an accepted way of life during World War ll. The books pictured here were issued in 1945. World War ll evoked many federal controls, which became a way of life and ultimately were thought of as a patriotic effort.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Columbus' first Dairy Queen at 1512 W. Fifth Ave., in Grandview opened in 1948 and still operates today.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Jane Fitting, writing for the Tri-Village News in summer 1983, recalled some of the differences of the "good old summertime" of her childhood and today. Astride the pony that made a regular summer visit to the neighborhood, Jane was dressed in her Sunday best for this photo. In her words, "Summer days were spent making mud pies and baking them in the sun, then using them to throw at friends in make-believe battle. Kites were made of newspapers. Shooting 'agates and glassies' in a ring drawn in the dirt, picking clover blossoms to make chains, and competing at hopscotch on the sidewalk were everyday games. Kids cooled off by playing in the hose. Pulling the shades before noon to keep in the cooler morning air was an everyday event in most households. Children were called in during the hottest part of the afternoon. Reading, making paper dolls out of magazine illustrations and doll houses out of boxes were the usual things done to pass time." Many times Jane's mother put a block of ice that the iceman had just delivered in a pan on the floor and turned the electric fan on it. That was the air conditioning of the day. An annual summer event to be counted on was the circus train unloading at the Grandview Avenue crossing, and people lined the streets to watch the parade with its clowns, calliope and elephants. Memories of past summers included homemade ice cream, family vacations, and playing under the street lights at night while grownups rested in wicker rockers or wooden porch swings.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    As co-salutatorian of her class, a member of National Honor Society and winner of the PTA scholarship, Suzie Hutchison (pictured) could be talking about music, studies, sports or senior-photo plans. She had much to say using the "social media" of the year 1963, as revealed in this photograph from the Grandview Heights High School yearbook. Suzie was chosen as one of the outstanding seniors of that year. She was secretary of the Grandview Athletic Association and a 1,000-point letter-winner. As Suzie participated in her varied school activities, she remained connected with friends, teachers and her scholastic endeavors by the network of the day: the rotary telephone.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    As they round the turn on Grandview Avenue, cyclists in this photo compete in the Grandview Cycling Classic. In 1994, when John Leutz was mayor of Grandview Heights, the cycling event took place on the hills of the city streets for the first time. The races featured both men and women cyclists in multiple professional categories. Over its 20 year-history, the tour has attracted more than 1,000 world-class cyclists and many more spectators because of the demanding hills and turns on the course that snakes through the neighborhood streets. The event has been spearheaded by the city of Grandview Heights; the Grandview Community Association, which was formed in 2005, now coordinates the community's signature event with activities for spectators and cyclists alike. The volunteer association counts on local residents and business people to promote the races and activities for the "health and well-being" of the Grandview Heights community. As a result, hundreds of volunteers are brought together to promote Ohio's premier cycling event with thousands of dollars in purse money -- a win-win activity for all participants.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Robert R. Livingston was only 59 years old when he died of kidney failure in 1958 at Mount Carmel Hospital. He had been with the Grandview Police Department since 1937, and was the chief of police for 14 years. Livingston came to Grandview at the age of 7 and graduated from Grandview High School in 1920. When Livingston sought work with the Grandview Police Department in 1937, the only vacancy was in the fire department, and he worked there for a short time before he transferred into the police department. He was well-known by the residents of Grandview and was not always in uniform. Here he is taking time with the children of Parkway Drive in summer 1948 to move a snapping turtle from the street into his cruiser. He thought the event warranted a picture, which was captured and saved in the scrapbook of Alleyne Jones. The tallest girl in the back is identified as Suzie Wheeler from Parkway Drive, and the boy with his hands on his knees is John Shough from Hilo Lane. The other children are not identified.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Blanche Field is pictured here as she announced her return from Chicago after studying classical dance, toe, Oriental and character dancing. She had earlier graduated from the Louis H. Chalif School of Dancing in New York City. The Chalif school was one of the earliest schools in the United States to instruct teachers in dance. Miss Field was born in Grandview Heights in 1901, lived at 1138 Lincoln Road and graduated from Grandview Heights High School in 1919. Upon her return from Chicago, she opened her dance studio. She was already established as a dancer and local dramatic artist. She was known in Grandview for her home and the studio she built at 1714 First Ave., where she continued to teach dance and kindergarten classes until 1955. Her memories of Grandview playmates and the games they played are recorded in early letters to friends. Though they were separated in later years (Blanche retired to Florida), friends from Lincoln Road kept in touch through memories recorded in letters, newspaper clippings and pictures with names and dates that were saved in "memory books," which were common in that era.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This football game program tells the story of the eighth annual battle between the Bobcats of Grandview Heights High School and Bexley's Fighting Lions. For eight years, the games had been played with the tradition of clean, wholesome athletic competition and with the victories favoring Bexley, while the total points favored Grandview, 92-60. Old programs saved by high-school students and fans reveal pastimes enjoyed and the support from the communities as well as businesses placing advertisements and best wishes for a winning game. "When you see me, don't think of Life Insurance, but when you think of Life Insurance, see me" was the half-page ad for Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co. located in the Buckeye Building. Rutherford and Co. Brokers, Miller and Reeves Architects, Dobbs Hats along with Tellings "unequaled quality ice cream" paid for attention in this Bexley program for the game Oct. 26, 1928. Bexley won its homecoming game 13-7. As you can see from the notation, it was claimed to be a good game.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The first home tour sponsored by the newly organized Grandview Heights/Marble Cliff Historical Society was held May 8, 1977. The five homes that were featured were located throughout the Grandview and Marble Cliff area and were all built between the years 1892 and 1911. Bruce and Jan Tovell opened their home at 1101 Broadview Ave. for touring along with Bob and Ruth Fridenstein, 1085 Westwood Ave.; Mark and Ellen Tomlinson, 1183 Wyandotte Road; Ray and Gretchen Stegmier,1342 Lincoln Road; and Tom and Leslie Palmer, 1492 Roxbury Road. A three-panel fold-out program contained a brief description of the homes and stories of past and present owners, and also served as an admission ticket (shown here) that sold for $1.50. The Westwood Avenue house remains one of the oldest homes in Grandview. The Fridensteins bought the home in 1960 from the Paddock family, who had lived there since 1909. They maintained some of the wildflowers and gardens that OSU professor Wendell Paddock had started (Paddock, also known as the Daffodil Man, was featured in a June 2004 Moment in Time. Details of preservation and remodeling along with histories of past and present owners were outlined In the program. The then-new publication by the historical society, "Sheltering A Heritage," also was available at each home. The society's home tour again returns on Mother's Day.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The land for this church was legally recorded as the West Fifth Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church, located at the northwest corner of West Fifth Avenue and North Star Road, in April 1891. The land was provided by the Rev. James S. Ricketts. At the time the church was originally formed, it met in private homes, until the Methodist Conference appointed the Rev. William C. Holliday as the first official minister. The membership grew and a chapel was built in 1902 on the corner of West Fifth and North Star. The population of the area and the membership grew and a new church building was erected in Grandview Heights on the corner of West First and Ashland Avenue. The name was changed to Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church. The time at this location covered World War l and the Depression years and a name change to Grandview Methodist Episcopal Church. This congregation continued to grow under the leadership of Frederick Ross, who was appointed in 1922. Paul Rugg came to the steadily growing congregation in 1939, and in that year the decision was made to buy two lots at the corner of Cambridge and West Fifth. In the next 10 years, the lots were paid for and construction was started on the renamed Trinity Methodist Church. The first service in the new building was held Sept. 30, 1951. Today's congregation enjoys new additions to the building and updates to offices and a still-growing attendance to the church that started with 64 neighbors and maintains the name Trinity United Methodist Church.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    This photo appeared in the 1945 Highlander of Grandview Heights High School and shows high school students throwing snowballs in the playground at the south end of the stadium.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Coach Robin Priday and Clark Lawrence with Jim Fais helping Mike Patton with his start.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Susan Swager, who was editor of the 1969 yearbook for Grandview Heights High School, is pictured here with her horse.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Mary Jean Bradley in the First Community Church's Trading Post. The post serves as a clearinghouse for gently used clothing and household items. Items are accepted on consignment or via donation and are resold at a low cost.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Grandview artist Harriet Kirkpatrick.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Caroline Thomas Harnsberger, pictured here sitting on the running board of her 1920s car, was an active swimmer, but went on to garner many more accomplishments in her lifetime.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    David Mock held his Grandview Heights High School classmates in total captivation as he recounted his first-hand account of the Dec. 7, 1941, bombing of Pearl Harbor. "All day the sky swarmed with flashing enemy planes. Fire and smoke rose wildly from shattered homes and buildings." He lived with his family near Pearl Harbor where they heard the first sounds of gunfire, at the time thinking it was only practice. As planes flew over and they became aware of the destruction around them, David and his father rushed to aid safety wardens and deliver newspapers. David Mock was a student at Grandview Heights High School at the time. John E. Hussey, David's grandfather, was one of the original landowners of Grandview Heights. The picture and story of David's experience was published in the Columbus Dispatch in December 1944. Pictured here at Grandview Heights High School with David and Nancy Conner (both seated in center) are classmates Jackie Henderson, Bill Arthur, Bill Wasem, Barbara Acton, Jean Young and Fred Hunt. They all served on the Highlander yearbook team.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The Grandview Heights Senior Center building, shown here as construction began, opened Oct. 16, 1982.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Early newspaper ad for James Cardi.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    John E. Hussey is pictured with his wife Margaret in 1957 on Catalina Island, the year before her death.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    In February 1942, mothers of servicemen responded to a newspaper request and formed the Blue Star Mothers of America Inc.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    In November 1932, Coach C.W. Zwick, pictured here in the second row with his Grandview varsity basketball team, had only two lettermen returning to the squad.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    Construction equipment frames the former "castle" owned by Sylvio Casparis, one of the original Marble Cliff Quarry founders and the owner of Casparis Stone Co. For more on this week's photo, click on the link below.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    The Grandview High School class of 1923 bid adieu to the "little old red schoolhouse," as did the other classes that attended there. Seniors were nostalgic, for the building (inset, lower image), on Fairview Avenue just north of First, had been their home with many cares and traditions for 10 years. The rising seniors, juniors, sophomores and freshmen would move to what the first graduating seniors would call "the big red schoolhouse," shown in a 1965 photo. As was reported in the 1923 yearbook, "It has been initiated. It no longer (is) a pile of bricks. It's alive, real, a living institution." As the class of 1924 graduated, it asked whether the class lived up to the ideals for which the school stands: justice, good will and clean play. They observed that those ideals were the intangible qualities the students held high as they laid the foundation for future generations. Grandview High School celebrates 90 years in 2013.
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  • Courtesy of the Grandview Heights-Marble Cliff Historical Society
    One of the original homes on First Avenue in the 1920s, 1578 W. First Ave. was purchased by Mr C.L "Whitey" Deyo in 1941. He opened his business as Deyo Funeral Home and started a tradition of personal funeral service to the Tri-Village area. In 1959, Mr. Deyo was joined by Ivan L. Davis and the partnership of Deyo-Davis Funeral Home was formed. Mr. Davis is one of the oldest active licensed funeral directors and embalmers in the state of Ohio. After the death of Mr. Deyo in 1964, Mr. Davis took over the service to the community with the name remaining the same. Ivan was later joined by his son, Jeffery, who received his funeral director's license in 1980. With expansion to the original home on West First Avenue and added parking facilities, this partnership continues its tradition of personal service to the families of the Tri-Village area.
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