We just got married. Each of us is used to handling our own finances, so dealing with two incomes and two sets of expectations is a new experience. What can we do to make sure the financial side of our marriage goes smoothly?

Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

We just got married. Each of us is used to handling our own finances, so dealing with two incomes and two sets of expectations is a new experience. What can we do to make sure the financial side of our marriage goes smoothly?


According to family counselors, finances are a major source of disagreement between couples. Partners often have different attitudes toward money, which can make reaching financial planning decisions difficult. If one partner is a saver and the other is a spender, or if one partner is more comfortable with risk than the other, creating a saving and financial strategy for both partners may be a challenge.

Couples often ignore their money differences until a crisis hits. But talking about financial issues early in a relationship can prevent stress and friction down the road. If you and your spouse disagree about finances, there are several things you can do:

First, talk about it. Choose a time to sit down and discuss your feelings about money. Attitudes about spending and saving often take root in childhood and usually stem from the way your families handled their finances. Knowing the basis for your feelings may give both of you a clearer understanding of your differences.

Second, develop a savings plan. If one partner wants to save every extra dollar and the other wants to spend it, you're going to have to compromise to keep both of you happy and on track with a savings plan. Choose a realistic amount to save toward your goals, but set aside some money each month to spend on yourselves. The "spender" will be more likely to stick with a savings plan that leaves room for some indulgence.

Third, get a professional opinion. Having someone who is objective review your financial situation and make suggestions may help you reach a compromise.