A longtime Fairfield County official appears set to remain in office another four years, but he'll switch jobs from county treasurer to auditor.

A longtime Fairfield County official appears set to remain in office another four years, but he'll switch jobs from county treasurer to auditor.

Fairfield County Republicans selected county treasurer Jon Slater Jr. in a three-way primary race for Fairfield County auditor.

Slater, 50, of Lancaster, has served as county treasurer since September 1993.

Because no Democrats or Independent candidates have filed to run in the November general election, it appears he'll take over the county auditor's office in January. Barbara Curtiss, the county auditor for the past 16 years, chose not to seek re-election.

"We're feeling good right now," Slater said Tuesday night. "We felt all along we would approach this having served the last 16 years as county treasurer; the voters would have some confidence in me.

"Tonight, they expressed that and I'm honored."

According to unofficial final results from the Fairfield County Board of Elections, Slater defeated Pickerington resident and current Fairfield County chief deputy auditor Ed Laramee by 6,175 votes (50.69 percent) to 4,111 votes (33.75 percent.)

Lori Anderson, a Carroll resident and co-owner and office manager of BusinessPro Inc., finished third in the GOP primary, with 1,896 votes (15.56 percent.)

Barring a challenge from a write-in candidate in November, Slater will take office as county auditor on March 14. The job currently pays $79,754 annually.

Slater credited his challengers with running solid campaigns, particularly Laramee, who he said probably was his toughest political opponent to date. He said the chief deputy auditor will be invited to stay aboard in the auditor's office, if he wishes.

"The worst thing that could happen is for the auditor's office to lose people," Slater said. "If Ed wants to continue working in that office, he's well-respected by people in the community.

"That respect is important to Fairfield County, it's important to the office and it's important to me."

Slater said he doesn't anticipate problems transitioning from treasurer to auditor. He said he'll consult with Curtiss before March and work to put his signature on the office.

"Changing hats is going to be an easy thing to do," he said. "The treasurer's office is a counterpart to the auditor's office in almost every function. I know the job and I know the people in the office. "I just look forward to brining immediately a new and different energy into the office. I'm excited."