Voters across Ohio, from the small towns of Cecil, Harpster and Potsdam to the metropolises of Columbus, Cleveland and Cincinnati, had something to say Tuesday about moving a proposed casino from one part of Columbus to another.

Voters across Ohio, from the small towns of Cecil, Harpster and Potsdam to the metropolises of Columbus, Cleveland and Cincinnati, had something to say Tuesday about moving a proposed casino from one part of Columbus to another.

Though some reject the idea of casinos in general, the Buckeye collective was fine with the move, with more than 60 percent approving, according to unofficial results from the Ohio Secretary of State's Office.

Issue 2 amends the Ohio Constitution to permit the Columbus casino's location to move from the Arena District to the site of a former GM-Delphi automotive plant on the West Side. The amendment is necessary because a previous constitutional amendment, which voters approved in November 2009 to allow casino gaming in Ohio, authorized casinos at specific sites in Columbus, Cleveland, Cincinnati and Toledo.

Penn National Gaming Inc., the Columbus casino developer and operator, agreed to a location change after listening to Columbus residents, political leaders and organizations. All urged an alternate location. The Ohio General Assembly, with strong bipartisan support, placed Issue 2 on the May 4 ballot.

Supporters of Issue 2 have said its passage would create 3,500 construction jobs and 2,000 permanent jobs and would generate $64.1-million in new casino tax revenues for Columbus, Franklin County and public schools, according to the Ohio Department of Taxation.

Third Frontier also breezes by
The only other state issue on the ballot was Issue 1, which involves Ohio's Third Frontier program.

More than 60 percent of the Ohio electorate also supported that measure, according to unofficial results from the Ohio Secretary of State's Office.

Created in 2002 within the Ohio Department of Development, Third Frontier aims to expand Ohio's high-tech research capabilities that are designed to accelerate the pace of commercialization within the state, according to Third Frontier's website.

Some programs supported by the Ohio Third Frontier include research and development of advanced energy programs, biomedical and fuel-cell research, the Ohio Research Commercialization grant program, entrepreneurial programs and others.

The constitutional amendment authorizes the state to issue up to $700-million in bonds for the initiative over a four-year period. The bonds would provide financial assistance and support for Third Frontier's research, product innovation and such industries as manufacturing, agribusiness and alternative energy.

ThisWeek staff writers Jeff Donahue and Lin Rice contributed to this story.