At one point in our conversation with David Crowder, he said he and his bandmates were "refugees from church culture."

At one point in our conversation with David Crowder, he said he and his bandmates were "refugees from church culture."

And later he said the title of the David Crowder Band's latest record, Church Music, is as literal as it gets.

"There are people who aren't aware that church music can sound like this," he explained, adding, "It was made to be done in our church. We're pretty aware it's not music to be done in all churches."

Crowder said his band has always made music for the kind of people they know and live with in Waco, Texas, which includes both the churched and non-churched.

"We're trying to redeem a bit of how faith is communicated," he explained. "We were having a lot of conversations about how pop music has changed. The most progressive church settings have this sort of U2/Coldplay vibe, but the pop charts are more urban in flavor, even with Katy Perry and Lady Gaga. The fundamental element is the beat, and that's where we wanted to start with this record.

"What the church tends to do is to have a reclamation of culture, then get comfortable, while the culture's gone someplace else," Crowder said. "We were very thoughtful in our metaphors and in our sound as a band. It ended up being more colloquial to a non-church setting."

"That's church music at its best," he concluded.

The viral culture embraced Crowder's latest video, for the song SMS (Shine), which featured stop-action production and a Lite Brite. Crowder also noted that a new ad for Old Navy features the art-toy, which had its heyday in the 1970s.

When we posed that the effort could boost him to cultural taste-maker status, Crowder was immediately sold.

"We could enjoy that," he laughed.

And when it was suggested that his trademark giant hair and goatee could also become popular, he replied, "That would be unfortunate."

For more from The Beat's interview with David Crowder, read the BeatBlog.