It might not appear on the ticket, but there are two competitions taking place at any football game between two historically black colleges and universities (HBCU).

It might not appear on the ticket, but there are two competitions taking place at any football game between two historically black colleges and universities (HBCU).

There is, of course, the game itself. But there is also the battle of the marching bands.

"It's part of the atmosphere of the school and the football games," explained Reggie Brayon, who is company manager for Drumline Live, a stage production that brings some of that pageantry to a concert hall experience. "People are there as much to see the band and to be a part of it - and not only at halftime."

"There's a competition, once you're in that stadium," he added. "The culture is 'My band is better than yours and we play better than you and we march better than you.'"

It makes for an intersection of music and other aspects of society, something perhaps not unique to the HBCU experience, but amplified.

"The marching bands are so integral to those institutions, the historically black colleges and universities, where in many places that's the branding of the school, what it's known for," Brayon said.

Created by the musical consultants from the Disney movie Drumline, Brayon said the hope was to "take this kind of HBCU experience to areas that don't typically see it on a Saturday."

The show features "every kind of music," and is adapted from themes used for marching band halftime shows.

Simply put, "it's a marching band doing what marching bands do," Brayon said. "We want people to feel like they're in the stands."

Of course, they're in a theater, so some allowances had to be made. Rather than a 200-piece band, the cast is comprised of 37 performers, most of whom play multiple instruments and some of whom also sing and/or dance. However, Drumline Live brings the show into the aisles at various points, and concludes with a New Orleans-style parade.

For more from The Beat's interview with Reggie Brayon, read the BeatBlog at www.ThisWeekNews.com.