Q & A

General

Friday October 26, 2012 5:18 PM

Question:

Do Members of Congress have to pay into Social Security?

Answer:

Yes, they do. Members of Congress, the President and Vice President, federal judges, and most political appointees, have paid taxes into the Social Security program since January 1984. They pay into the system just like everyone else, no matter how long they have been in office. Learn more about Social Security benefits at www.socialsecurity.gov.

 

Question:

I received a notice from Social Security recently. It said my name and Social Security number do not match Social Security’s records. What should I do?

Answer:

It’s critical that your name and Social Security number, as shown on your Social Security card, match your employer’s payroll records and your W-2 form. If they don’t, here is what you need to do:

  • Give your employer the correct information exactly as shown on your Social Security card or your corrected card; or
  • Contact your local Social Security office (www.socialsecurity.gov/locator) or call 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778) if your Social Security card does not show your correct name or Social Security number.

For more information, visit our website at www.socialsecurity.gov.


Question:

Are Social Security numbers reassigned after a person dies?

Answer:

No. We do not reassign Social Security numbers. In all, we have assigned more than 460 million Social Security numbers, and each year we assign about 5.5 million new numbers. The current system has enough new numbers for several more generations. For more information, visit our website at www.socialsecurity.gov or call us toll-free at 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778).

 

Question:

How do I change my citizenship status on Social Security’s records?

Answer:

To change the citizenship shown on our records:

  • Complete and print a new Application For A Social Security Card (Form SS-5) at www.socialsecurity.gov/ssnumber/ss5.htm; and
  • Show us documents proving your:
  • New or revised citizenship status (Only certain documents can be accepted as proof of citizenship. These include your U.S. passport, a Certificate of Naturalization, or a Certificate of Citizenship. If you are not a U.S. citizen, Social Security will ask to see your current immigration documents);
  •  Age; and
  •  Identity.
  • Take (or mail) your completed application and documents to your local Social Security office.

All documents must be either originals or copies certified by the issuing agency. We cannot accept photocopies or notarized copies of documents. For more information, visit  www.socialsecurity.gov.

 

Question:

I worked for the last 10 years and I now have my 40 credits. Does this mean that I can stop working and get the maximum Social Security retirement benefit when it’s time to retire?

Answer:

The 40 credits are the minimum number you need to qualify for retirement benefits. However, we do not base the amount of the benefit on those credits; we base it on your earnings over your working lifetime. To learn more about Social Security retirement benefits and how your benefit amount is figured, read our online publication, Retirement Benefits.

 

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