It still surprises Frank Resch when people tell him that cakes from his bakery are an integral part of their family celebrations. "It's amazing," he said. "Every time I hear it, it's hard to believe. It makes me feel good. It makes it worthwhile."

Photos by Tim Johnson It still surprises Frank Resch when people tell him that cakes from his bakery are an integral part of their family celebrations. "It's amazing," he said. "Every time I hear it, it's hard to believe. It makes me feel good. It makes it worthwhile." Resch is the current proprietor of the East Side business that was started in 1912. The bakery continues to draw crowds for its delicious cakes and glazed donuts. Do you feel extra pressure running a 100-year-old family business? The only pressure I feel is the economy. I feel as long as we make good products and keep our prices reasonable, people will buy it. What are some of your memories of growing up in the business? We just lived around the corner. My dad would come up at about 11 o'clock every night and check on things. He'd count the register. He'd bring me along. What item in the bakery do you think is the most similar to something your great grandfather would have sold? The bread. The bread would be pretty much the same - and the hard rolls. Everything else has evolved over the years. Tell me about some of the bakery's holiday specials. At Thanksgiving, it's dinner rolls and pies. At Christmas, we make cookies - thumbprint cookies. We make stollen. We've been making that a long time. It's sweet bread with rum-soaked raisins. The flour comes from Germany. At Easter, we do hot-cross buns. Do you like to add new things? People are funny. We'll put new stuff out - they want the same old things.