If you combined Opera Columbus, BalletMet Columbus and the Columbus Symphony Orchestra all in the same program -- and on stage simultaneously -- things could get pretty twisted.

If you combined Opera Columbus, BalletMet Columbus and the Columbus Symphony Orchestra all in the same program -- and on stage simultaneously -- things could get pretty twisted.

Twisted, the season-opening program for all three performing arts organizations, marks a landmark collaborative effort featuring selections from operatic masterworks performed by singers from Opera Columbus, the Columbus Symphony Orchestra and Chorus and choreographed for the dancers of BalletMet.

""It's a celebration of the arts in Columbus, a combination of these three organizations that shows it's not a competition," said Edwaard Liang, BalletMet artistic director.

"More is more."

"It's a special fusion of the best of what Columbus has to offer," added Mike Stefiuk, CSO director of artistic planning.

Twisted does not tell a story, but is intended as a pure representation of art.

"All the organizations receive equal performance time, as if they were one company," said Peggy Kriha Dye, Opera Columbus artistic director.

"Everybody is equally involved," Dye said. "The singers and dancers are dressed alike. The dancers move through the orchestra."

"The singers have a lot of integrated motion right in with the dancers," said Susan Dromisky, BalletMet ballet mistress.

"There is no pit," Dromisky said.

"Nobody is offstage or backstage. All of the performers are at the same eye level, and with the number that will be on stage together, it's extraordinary."

Dye said the music selections -- pieces from Carmen, La Boheme, The Magic Flute and more -- were made first, naturally drawn from orchestral operatic repertoire and intended to represent the pillars of the form.

The selections were presented to a team of choreographers -- including Liang and BalletMet's Jimmy Orrante -- who were tasked with providing, in Dye's words, a "choreographic impression of the music."

"All three of our organizations speak a different 'language,' " Dye said, "but in the end we are reinterpreting this familiar music together."