I read with interest the Oct. 14 Columbus Dispatch article titled, "Education a top concern for 2 in new House district."

To the Editor:

I read with interest the Oct. 14 Columbus Dispatch article titled, "Education a top concern for 2 in new House district."

Hilliard residents will be deeply affected by the winners of Ohio House Districts 24 (mentioned in the article) and 23. The Hilliard school district is taking measures to reduce operating costs, but residents have been advised that another levy is coming in a couple of years.

In the Dispatch article, Maureen Reedy, an Upper Arlington teacher and the Democratic candidate for the 24th district, displayed an understanding that our state government has enacted significant funding cuts to schools across Ohio. She mentioned a willingness to work with both political parties to solve our school funding problems at a state level.

Conversely, Stephanie Kunze said she "sees some benefit for communities such as Hilliard and Upper Arlington to pass their own taxes."

Really? How many local levies can communities all across Ohio take? And is it fair to children who live in poorer districts? This will only widen the gap for access to good education. A poorly educated population leads to more crime and other social ills which do not stay within neighborhood boundaries. I cannot afford to keep increasing my property taxes.

In the 23rd district, Cheryl Grossman, the Republican incumbent, votes with the current party leadership to slash school funding. Her challenger, Traci Johnson, is interested in bringing fairness back into the state budget process so that the proverbial can of educating our children is not kicked down the road to property tax-paying residents.

Everyone must do their part in making schools cost-effective. It's time for Ohio's politicians to accept their share of responsibility.

This is a critical election. I urge voters to support Reedy in the 24th district and Johnson in the 23rd district.

Cynthia Vermillion
Hilliard