Imagine a school where students who need one-on-one time with a librarian can arrange for that type of research guidance.

To the Editor:

Imagine a school where students who need one-on-one time with a librarian can arrange for that type of research guidance. And think about the math lab, writing lab, global language lab and media lab where students can meet with teachers to get extra help without paying for a private tutor.

This school has highly motivated teachers who feel valued by their community and give back by teaching their hearts out, connecting with students by chaperoning dances, attending school plays and sporting events, even though that's not in their job descriptions.

About 50 percent of teachers in this community's schools live in the district, so their emotional ties are strong and they also pay higher taxes when a school levy is passed.

There was a time when this was the reality of UA schools, but no more. With the "success" of the "It's OK to Say No" campaign, the next school year will look and feel very different.

Last year, I met with several Columbus high school teachers who told me that they taught 150 students daily. Teachers with those numbers simply cannot teach the way it has been possible to in Upper Arlington. Creativity and writing assignments are too often abandoned when teachers are overwhelmed by their workloads.

Those who don't know any teachers often have no idea of the number of hours spent most evenings and weekends doing things like lesson planning, grading and clerical chores.

Columbus teachers have a tough job, and their situation is illustrative of why 50 percent of those who enter teaching in the U.S. leave by the end of their fifth year.

Upper Arlington has always valued education. Let's continue this proud tradition before the harm done is irreparable.

Linda Roomann
Upper Arlington