Our history is slipping away one demolition at a time. The demolition of the 192-year-old house built by Revolutionary War veteran Amaziah Hutchinson in 1821 is very sad for the whole community, not just Upper Arlington.

To the Editor:

Our history is slipping away one demolition at a time.

The demolition of the 192-year-old house built by Revolutionary War veteran Amaziah Hutchinson in 1821 is very sad for the whole community, not just Upper Arlington.

It would be easy to blame the developer, who bought the land and will be building an apartment complex there, but I am sure they did everything the city asked of them over the long time this has been in the planning stages. It is understandable that the developer couldn't change plans at this late date. They did delay the demolition for an additional nine days while the Upper Arlington Historical Society explored options for moving the house.

The question is, why did the city of Upper Arlington not contact the Upper Arlington Historical Society earlier than when the 10-day notice of demolition was placed on the property? Did no one at the city wonder if the house was more significant than just a pile of rocks that was in the way of development?

With more notice, there would have been time to raise the funds and move the house.

This was an opportunity for everyone to win; the developer would have looked good respecting the past of a community they are moving into, the city for appreciating its own history and, of course, the real beneficiaries would have been the current and future residents of Franklin County. Instead, we have all lost a real connection to our country's past.

Although I moved to California over two years ago, I left some of my heart in Upper Arlington and still have my passion for the community and its history.

The nearest city to my new home, Capitola, has only 10,000 residents, but the salary of the museum director/historian is paid by the city.

When I mentioned the house demolition to several people out here, they can't understand why a community as wonderful as Upper Arlington isn't proud of its history and doesn't cherish and protect it. I can't, either.

Kate Erstein

former executive director

UA Historical Society

Aptos, Calif.