Pidge Jobst wants to know what it takes to get an audience with Jack Nicklaus.

Pidge Jobst wants to know what it takes to get an audience with Jack Nicklaus. He figures he's already done enough, painting a giant 9-foot-high "Roar Behind the Putt" mural of one of the greatest moments in the Golden Bear's golfing career.

He figures wrong.

"As far as I know, he's never seen it," said Jobst. But it's not for lack of trying.

"I had an agent at one point and they got in touch with his marketing arm in Florida," said Jobst. "There was an arrangement for him to see it on two occasions, but it never happened."

The painting currently is displayed prominently inside the Bogey Inn on Glick Road-appropriately, one of the most popular stops for crowds during the week that Nicklaus's Memorial Tournament takes place at the nearby Muirfield Village Golf Club.

Jobst tries to be understanding. "I know he's busy and he's probably had a thousand paintings of him."

But, he adds, "It's not just any painting. I don't know that anyone has incorporated a bear into paintings of Nicklaus."

The 7-foot wide mural-which took Jobst six months to complete-portrays Nicklaus's famous putt that won him the Masters tournament at Augusta in 1986-perhaps the most emotional win of his career. The painting also features a golden Kodiak bear behind him, to celebrate the legend's long standing nickname, sparked by his golden-colored hair, or his Upper Arlington roots, depending upon which version of the tale one chooses to believe.

"It's like his alter ego is behind him," Jobst said of the rather disconcerting giant bear in the center of a golf image. "He was with him the whole time."

Jobst's artistic commemoration was painted with the idea that Nicklaus would see the painting, fall in love with it and commission Jobst to create a Golden Bear series that showed famous shots made by Nicklaus with the bear in the background. But after two failed attempts to get the hometown legend to even see the painting, Jobst has decided to sell the piece. He said he's looking for $15,000 to $20,000.

"Obviously, I wanted him to sign it. I wanted it to be the 25 year commemorative painting," said Jobst. "I think if he saw it, he'd like it."

Nicklaus's agent said the golfing great was unable to comment.

Jobst has painted several murals locally, including the giant Crew Soccer ball that looked like it was crashing into the Brunsen building on High Street in 2006.

Pidge Jobst wants to know what it takes to get an audience with Jack Nicklaus. He figures he's already done enough, painting a giant 9-foot-high "Roar Behind the Putt" mural of one of the greatest moments in the Golden Bear's golfing career.

He figures wrong.

"As far as I know, he's never seen it," said Jobst. But it's not for lack of trying.

"I had an agent at one point and they got in touch with his marketing arm in Florida," said Jobst. "There was an arrangement for him to see it on two occasions, but it never happened."

The painting currently is displayed prominently inside the Bogey Inn on Glick Road-appropriately, one of the most popular stops for crowds during the week that Nicklaus's Memorial Tournament takes place at the nearby Muirfield Village Golf Club.

Jobst tries to be understanding. "I know he's busy and he's probably had a thousand paintings of him."

But, he adds, "It's not just any painting. I don't know that anyone has incorporated a bear into paintings of Nicklaus."

The 7-foot wide mural-which took Jobst six months to complete-portrays Nicklaus's famous putt that won him the Masters tournament at Augusta in 1986-perhaps the most emotional win of his career. The painting also features a golden Kodiak bear behind him, to celebrate the legend's long standing nickname, sparked by his golden-colored hair, or his Upper Arlington roots, depending upon which version of the tale one chooses to believe.

"It's like his alter ego is behind him," Jobst said of the rather disconcerting giant bear in the center of a golf image. "He was with him the whole time."

Jobst's artistic commemoration was painted with the idea that Nicklaus would see the painting, fall in love with it and commission Jobst to create a Golden Bear series that showed famous shots made by Nicklaus with the bear in the background. But after two failed attempts to get the hometown legend to even see the painting, Jobst has decided to sell the piece. He said he's looking for $15,000 to $20,000.

"Obviously, I wanted him to sign it. I wanted it to be the 25 year commemorative painting," said Jobst. "I think if he saw it, he'd like it."

Nicklaus's agent said the golfing great was unable to comment.

Jobst has painted several murals locally, including the giant Crew Soccer ball that looked like it was crashing into the Brunsen building on High Street in 2006.