For Mollie Lakin, sifting through old photos at the Columbus Jewish Historical Society on Nov. 18 brought back some great memories.

For Mollie Lakin, sifting through old photos at the Columbus Jewish Historical Society on Nov. 18 brought back some great memories.

The Wexner Heritage Village resident, who has lived in central Ohio since 1951, said she found photos of old friends that were taken at different events for the Jewish community.

"I'm enjoying every second of this," she said. "It brings back a lot of memories."

Lakin and about a dozen others gathered at the College Avenue historical society to look at old photographs and to try to identify the individuals in them for the Columbus Jewish Historical Society's archives -- an event the organizers called "Name that Punim," or "Name that beautiful face" in Yiddish.

Cindy McLaughlin, the archivist at the historical society, said she hoped the event would help the historical society staff keep a better record of Jewish history in central Ohio.

Many of the photos are displayed at the Jewish Community Center, also on College Avenue.

McLaughlin said she prepared photocopies of the photographs, which were taken between the 1950s and 1970s.

McLaughlin assigned a number to each person in the photograph and attached a piece of paper to the back, so those in attendance could write down the names of who they thought was in the picture.

Participants passed the photos around a big board table while noshing on snacks provided by the historical society. Many of the pictures were taken during events for such organizations as the Columbus Jewish Federation and Hadassah.

McLaughlin said the historical society has been holding the "Punim" event for years, but had not had one recently.

Honey Abramson, who grew up as a member of the Tifereth Israel congregation in Columbus, said she knew many people in the photographs from when she was younger -- through her synagogue, school and as chair of the United Jewish Fund in central Ohio.

Abramson worked with Norma Brodsky to identify those in the archive's pictures. Brodsky said she was able to identify six or seven people in an hour.

The Columbus resident also brought with her photographs from her personal collection to donate to the historical society.

"This is called giving back," she said.

A closer look