To celebrate its 25th anniversary, Thurber House is working with the Rare Books and Manuscripts Library at Ohio State University to display lesser-known cartoons by the nonprofit's namesake.

To celebrate its 25th anniversary, Thurber House is working with the Rare Books and Manuscripts Library at Ohio State University to display lesser-known cartoons by the nonprofit's namesake.

The free exhibit, "Thurber in the House," will be open 1-4 p.m. daily from May 1 through Sept. 6 at the Thurber Center, 91 Jefferson Ave. Included in the exhibit will be 29 archival quality facsimiles of Thurber's cartoons.

In addition, there will be five drawings that have not been previously exhibited.

"There are some unpublished ones and probably many that people haven't seen in a long time," said Geoffrey Smith, head of the OSU library. "There are certain ones that have just been done over and over that and we are trying to avoid that. We wanted something fresher."

The library is home to more than 20,000 manuscript and typescript leaves of Thurber's work and nearly 500 original drawings.

Considered one of the great American humorists of the past century, Thurber was known for both his short stories and drawings. His more famous short stories include "The Catbird Seat" and "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty."

Smith said Thurber's drawings were an easy choice for an exhibit.

"They are not particularly elaborate, but they were converted to magazine publications," Smith said. "They are simple line drawings, but people who try to imitate him have great difficulty. It's not as easy as they think."

The drawings will be grouped into several categories -- anti-social, men, domestic bliss, love and marriage, nature of men and women, animal artist and dogs.

Smith said many of the drawings are subtler than Thurber's more recognized works.

"We tried to get a number of them that showed a realistic tension between men and women," he said. "Some things are easy to take pot shots at, others are more difficult."

Rebecca Jewitt, assistant curator for the rare books and manuscripts library, poured over the library's collection of Thurber drawings while setting up the exhibit.

She said it took a year to research and plan the event.

"Thurber is probably the most famous writer to attend Ohio State University," Smith said. "This is not something we do on an annual basis."