Bexley City Council agreed Tuesday night to amend the city's campus planning district to rezone several parcels owned by Capital University.

Bexley City Council agreed Tuesday night to amend the city's campus planning district to rezone several parcels owned by Capital University.

Council held public hearings on the issue during its regular meeting and zoning and development committee meeting. During the hearings, several residents and council members expressed concern about the condition of some of Capital's rental units on Sheridan Avenue, but council passed the rezoning unanimously.

The campus planning district was put in place about four years ago and includes dormitories, athletic fields, student activity centers and classrooms. The rezoning of the parcels is consistent with the city's southwestern plan, which designates property in that section of Bexley for future campus use, development director Bruce Langner has said.

Bexley residents Jake and Mary White spoke against the rezoning.

"The Capital students are ruining our neighborhood," Jake White said.

Mary White said neighbors have problems every Friday and Saturday night.

"It is not unusual to walk down the street and see human feces, puke and beer cans," she said.

Resident Mark Ackery said several drunken students were trying to break a tree on his lawn over the weekend. He requested Bexley and Capital hold a meeting.

Bexley police Chief Larry Rinehart said he has received fewer complaints this year than last year. He tries to step up police patrols around campus when the weather gets warm.

Council member Mark Masser, who said he was "mad and upset" about the problems on Sheridan, also suggested Capital should meet with its neighbors.

"We were all kids," he said. "We all did crazy things. Let's have a little respect."

Troy Bonte, Capital University's director of facility management, said there are mechanisms in place to deal with off-campus issues.

Council member Ben Kessler said he supported the rezoning request but encouraged Capital to set the standard for the neighborhood.

City attorney Lou Chodosh said problems have decreased dramatically since the city and university put a good neighbor agreement in place.

"Personally, every single weekend I drive up and down Sheridan," Chodosh said. "I have not seen the things people have described."

tstubbs@thisweeknews.com