The Bexley Land Use Strategy Commission is expected to present its final recommendations to city council by the end of summer, commission chairman and council member Ben Kessler said this week.

The Bexley Land Use Strategy Commission is expected to present its final recommendations to city council by the end of summer, commission chairman and council member Ben Kessler said this week.

The commission was started a little more than a year ago to develop long-term development strategies for Bexley and make recommendations for the next 10 years, with the goal of reconvening every six years to examine the strategies.

"Right now we are working on a draft of the strategy," Kessler told ThisWeek in an interview. "I think two or three of the four study areas are in draft form."

The commission expects to meet again this month to begin discussing the drafts, he said.

The four study areas are the north side of Livingston Avenue from Ferndale to Mayfield; Main Street; North Cassady and Delmar; and Alum Creek between Livingston and Main Street.

The commission should have a rough draft for all the study areas finished by June, with a public meeting to review the plan shortly thereafter. A final report would be delivered to council by the end of summer, Kessler said. Council will have to approve the final document.

The commission already has gathered some public input -- residents formed a group that has been discussing strategies for the North Cassady corridor, Kessler said.

The commission also is working with Ohio State University's Fisher College of Business. Commission member Ken Gold's students worked on North Cassady redevelopment recommendations for 10 weeks and presented reports March 11 at Ohio State in front of seven judges, who included Kessler.

"It has really become a very active portion of the strategy," Kessler said. "I'm surprised by how much interest there has been in North Cassady. It was a really good surprise."

Students studied the North Cassady corridor from Ruhl to the railroad tracks, Gold said. The students -- who are studying city and regional planning, construction management, law, geography and civil engineering -- learned about the corridor and identified redevelopment potential for existing buildings and a common commercial theme.

Two groups are fine-tuning their presentations and are expected to present them to the land-use commission in April.

"They came up with terrific presentations and great ideas," Gold said. "I'm sure some things they have come up with will surprise the community."

Gold said he was unwilling to share the ideas because the students have not made formal presentations to city officials.

Kessler said he is unsure how the student presentations will fit into the final strategy. The commission will make the decision on how to incorporate information gathered by the students.

"I would assume there will be an element of the student presentations incorporated into the final strategy," he said.

Once Bexley City Council approves the land-use strategies, the information will be used to make changes to the zoning code and guide development and redevelopment in the various corridors.

"My hope is that the guidelines presented will be used in the decision making process in the future by the city," Kessler said. "The whole inspiration of putting the strategy together was the need to have a coherent, unified vision within the city when it comes to redevelopment sites throughout the city."