From digital photography to three-dimensional creations, the artwork of 48 Bexley High School seniors is on display in the art wing of the Cassingham Complex through May 21. An opening reception was held on April 22 for the students.

From digital photography to three-dimensional creations, the artwork of 48 Bexley High School seniors is on display in the art wing of the Cassingham Complex through May 21. An opening reception was held on April 22 for the students.

Art teacher Mabi Ponce de Leon said the art show gives seniors an opportunity to showcase what they have done during their high school careers.

The art shows gives seniors "hope, pride and the experience of putting together an exhibit," she said. "I think a lot of people don't know what we do, the fact we have an art program."

Erin Lusignolo's exhibit features three-dimensional work. Her favorite piece features a book she found at home. She used a propane torch to give the book a burned look and affixed a pack of matches.

"I use a lot of found objects and alter them," she said

Lusignolo said art gives her an opportunity to express herself. She plans to study art in college and may major in fashion design.

Regina Vilenskaya's exhibit features her photography. Her favorite piece is a photograph of a flower, because she likes the crispness of the flower as the focal point.

"I used to want to be a photographer," she said.

Vilenskaya developed a passion for art after watching her father take photographs. She once wanted to work as a photographer but has since decided to become a teacher.

Mashhood Salahuddin's exhibit features "mixed media on paper." Mixed media uses more than one medium to create a piece of art.

Much of his work features geometric shapes. One piece uses geometric shapes to depict an assassination attempt and a man's attempt to protect his wife, he said.

Salahuddin has been interested in art since he was in elementary school, when he liked "to draw airplanes and cars."

He said he plans to major in biomedical or mechanical engineering in college and likes the senior art show because it provides an opportunity to share a different side of himself.

Ariel Vitartas' exhibit features a wide range of mediums including computer design, print making and digital photography.

"It has little bit of everything," she said.

Vitartas said the senior art show gives her a chance to show what she has been working on the past four years, like choir and orchestra students who get to perform at annual concerts.

Megan Hoyle's exhibit features photography and water colors with a variety of outdoor objects, she said. One of her favorite works features a statue from her backyard.

"It was my very first picture I took on a film camera," she said.

She also likes a photo she took of her cat, Mu, even though she doesn't "know how I got him to look at the camera."

Hoyle has been taking pictures for about three years and started working in digital film a year ago. Photography runs in her family - both parents attended Columbus College of Art and Design. She has been accepted to the Ringling College of Art and Design in Sarasota, Fla.

Lauren Howard said art is a hobby and a passion. She plans to major in nutrition at Ohio State University and minor in art. She uses mixed media to create collages.

Her favorite selection features a picture of a church steeple and several pictures of Bible pages that have been interwoven.

Of the art show, she said, "People can see what you are really good at. I'm not the smartest not the most athletic."

Rachel Hughes' exhibit features digital manipulation of photography, in which the artist takes a photograph and then draws or paints on it to create a new picture.

One of her favorite pieces features a picture she took of a soccer field with a soccer net and a football. The football is faded, and she changed some colors in the picture.

Hughes' grandfather is an artist whose work is on display at several Bexley galleries. He taught her how to paint with oil, but she didn't maintain a passion for oil painting, she said. After taking a break from art last year, she started taking digital photographs.

Digital media allows the artist to take two photographs that aren't complete by themselves and combine them to create a piece of art, Hughes said.

"It makes things seem supernatural," she said.