The Bexley City School district is looking for qualified candidates for the new position of assistant middle school principal created by Superintendent Mike Johnson.

The Bexley City School district is looking for qualified candidates for the new position of assistant middle school principal created by Superintendent Mike Johnson.

Johnson was given the green light to hire a new assistant middle school principal at the June 28 school board meeting. The board also named Bexley Middle School principal Harley Williams as director of secondary schools and accepted the resignation of John Kellogg.

Kellogg is leaving the district to serve as executive director of high schools for South-Western City Schools.

The new assistant principal position was approved on first reading after the board recessed into executive session.

Public information coordinator Amy Thompson said the middle school principal position was posted by the district on June 29. Johnson hopes to make a recommendation for the position when the board meets on July 19, she said.

Johnson told the board he was looking for an assistant principal with experience working with middle school students. He said job duties will be similar to those of high school assistant principal Kristin Robbins.

School board member Diane Peterson was pleased with the job description for the new assistant principal and said she felt "comfortable with the responsibilities included in the job description."

Board president Joan Fishel said it was important to recognize the difference between a middle and high school assistant principal Middle school students should be treated as unique individuals, she said.

Peterson noted the new position will not cost the district more money because secondary schools are being restructured to replace Kellogg.

Williams made $110,270 in salary as middle school principal and will make $123,000 a year as director of secondary schools. The middle school assistant will be paid $85,000 to $89,000 a year. The figures don't include benefits.

District officials also honored Kellogg for his work and praised his accomplishments.

Johnson read a list of those accomplishments, which included redesigning the social studies curriculum, increasing participation by students in Advanced Placement courses, advocating for a college counselor and improving scores on the Ohio Graduation Test.

"Most importantly to me, you paid attention to the students who needed the most from us, the hardest to serve students," Johnson said.

Fishel also thanked Kellogg for his work in the district. As a board member she didn't always agree with his ideas, she said, but he usually felt strongly enough to advocate for the change and convince the board.

"As a board member I was constantly impressed with your willingness to push not only yourself but the staff and students," she said.

As a parent, Fishel also praised Kellogg's work, adding that she saw first hand how Kellogg helped district students succeed when she sent her daughter to college.

Kellogg thanked the board and Johnson for their comments but acknowledged the effort that teachers also put into making BHS better.

"There were teachers involved in many of those things," he said. "Many were not Kellogg initiatives."