Bexley residents will see some landscaping improvements at a former tree nursery site but shouldn't expect to see any development in the immediate future.

Bexley residents will see some landscaping improvements at a former tree nursery site but shouldn't expect to see any development in the immediate future.

Bexley City Council's zoning and development committee held a public hearing on July 27 to consider the Bexley Tree and Public Garden Commission's recommendation to allow the property owner to move stone columns, iron gates and a hedge into the city right of way at 2364 Caroline Ave.

The city sold the former tree nursery site to developer Jubilee Brice LLC for $350,000 in March 2009. Brice also owns 2376 Caroline Ave.

City council and developers had spent about six years debating what should become of 2.44 acres that once were home to a city-owned tree nursery.

Zoning officer Kathy Rose said the developer filed a landscape plan earlier this year for the property which included stone columns and a iron fence. The property owner now asks for the landscape improvements to be located in the right of way.

"Farther back down the access drive they won't be very visible," Rose said. "The owner would prefer to bring them out to the street."

Rose said the building department asked the tree and public garden commission to take a look at the plans before bringing them to council. The tree commission looked at the plans on July 14, she said.

In March, the property owner asked and was granted permission to demolish two houses on the property. At the same time, the landscape plan also was approved by the building department. To date, the property owner hasn't filed any paperwork with the building department to redevelop the site, Rose said.

The Jubilee Brice LLC partnership represents the interests of Upper Arlington architect, builder and developer L. Rider Brice and Bexley resident Jay Schottenstein, who tried separately on different occasions to purchase the former tree nursery site.

Brice told ThisWeek plans for development have been put on hold and the landscape improvements are being done to make the property more aesthetically pleasing.

"The development has been held up because of the economy," he said.

The ultimate goal is to develop some single-family houses on about six acres on Caroline Avenue, Brice said.