Bexley's Planning Commission has agreed to approve the demolition of a Main Street property despite the fact that the developer doesn't have a firm agreement in place with a future user of the site.

Bexley's Planning Commission has agreed to approve the demolition of a Main Street property despite the fact that the developer doesn't have a firm agreement in place with a future user of the site.

During the commission's Aug. 23 meeting, members held a lengthy discussion before agreeing to approve a request by Hero Investments, Inc. to demolish a house at 2599 E. Main St. and to make improvements to an existing building, the former Huntington Bank building, at 2585 E. Main St.

Developer John Royer said he intends to market the site, preferably to a restaurant, but denied earlier reports that he has an agreement in place with Piada Italian Street Food.

The plan calls for the lot at 2599 E. Main St. to be used for parking for a new restaurant that would be located at 2585 E. Main St.

Royer's plan calls for modifying the exterior of the Huntington building with windows facing on Main Street, and a window/door combination on the east side of the front of the building. A patio on the front would be connected to a brick walkway to a plaza at the corner of Main and Remington.

The drive in the front would be eliminated and a pick-up window would be relocated to the rear of the building.

The majority of parking would be to the south side of the building, parallel to the alley, and on the adjacent lot to the east of the building. Screening for the parking lot along Main Street would consist of a landscape bed, brick piers and a wrought iron fence.

Royer argued that he needed to be able to tear down the house at 2599 E. Main St. to market the site and find a suitable user within a reasonable time frame. He said whether Piada, or another business locates there, he has received positive feedback about the site from several potential restaurant operators.

Despite the uncertainty about the eventual user, commission members agreed that the house at 2599 E. Main St. did not fit in with the urban character of the Main Street corridor. They also agreed with Royer's contention that the site would be more appealing to potential users with the house removed and approved his request.

jdonahue@thisweeknews.com

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