Urgent Care locations offer treatment for non-life-threatening illnesses and injuries that need immediate attention but are not serious enough to warrant a trip to the emergency department.

Urgent Care locations offer treatment for non-life-threatening illnesses and injuries that need immediate attention but are not serious enough to warrant a trip to the emergency department.

Treatment for the following conditions is provided: minor cuts, minor/small burns, possible broken bones/simple fractures (facility will perform X-rays and initial treatment), sprains and strains, vomiting, diarrhea, asthma (mild or moderate wheezing), rashes, mild allergic reactions and fever.

Nationwide Children's Hospital offers five urgent care facilities (including the main campus office) with evening and weekend hours, and can be considered an extension of a community pediatrician's office.

Go to the emergency department if you feel your child's problem is a true emergency, or for treatment of the following conditions: major trauma/injuries, injuries involving a motor vehicle crash or being struck by a motor vehicle, a fall from a height, serious head injury with loss of consciousness, changes in normal behavior, or vomiting, serious or large burns, obvious broken bone in the leg or arm, severe difficulty breathing, fever in infants eight weeks of age or less, severe pain and seizures.

Nationwide Children's Hospital's Emergency Department is one of the busiest in the country and is ranked third in the nation by Parents Magazine. From Jan. 1, 2008, to June 30, 2009, there were 120,929 visits to the E.D. and 276,908 total emergency services rendered. The E.D. at Nationwide Children's Hospital provides expertise in pediatric advanced life support and resuscitation as well as evaluation and treatment in every area for acute medical and surgical conditions.

Talk with your doctor before your child gets sick about how to handle emergencies and inquire about the doctor's policy on addressing medical needs outside of office hours. Having that information ahead of time will mean one less thing to worry about when your child is sick.

If you think your child is experiencing a medical emergency or life-threatening condition, always call 911. In situations where calling 911 isn't necessary, you should always call your child's pediatrician or family doctor first to determine the best treatment option. If you think someone is poisoned, call the Central Ohio Poison Center at 1-800-222-1222.