The staff at Bexley High School will shift around a bit this coming fall, with Neal Tomich, who formerly taught in the English Department, taking the place of retiring library aide Vikki Almos.

The staff at Bexley High School will shift around a bit this coming fall, with Neal Tomich, who formerly taught in the English Department, taking the place of retiring library aide Vikki Almos.

Assuming Tomich's position will be Jamie Hayes, who had a one-year appointment at BHS last year when her name was still Jamie Tominack. She was married this summer in Hilton Head, S.C.

This is Hayes' tenth year in education, having spent five at Newark High School, two in Reynoldsburg and one year at West High School in Columbus before arriving in Bexley in 2010 on a one-year appointment. She earned a bachelor's degree in English and a master's in English education, both from Ohio State University.

"I am very excited that it worked out that I can stay at Bexley," she said.

With the summer winding down, Hayes said she is participating in some professional development. She is continuing her work as part of an argument-writing study being conducted by George Newell of Ohio State University's College of Education and Human Ecology. Newell teaches courses on the teaching of writing and literature and focuses his research on written composition.

This week, Hayes is analyzing data with Newell's colleague, Alan Hirvela, who observed in her classroom last year and will continue observations in the coming school year.

Hayes is also looking forward to an Advanced Placement conference that she will attend at Northwestern University Aug. 1-5.

"Even though I am not currently teaching AP, this experience will help me prepare my students in regular and honors English classes to take AP English their junior and senior years and for me to help all of my students become better readers and writers," she said. "Because Bexley has a focus on AP, I want to gain more experience in this area."

Since Bexley High School adopted AP as its educational best practice in 2003, the number of students participating in the college preparatory courses has steadily increased, as has the number of students scoring a "3" or above on the AP exams at the end of the courses.