Every young child aspires to grow up and be something great, and I am no exception. However, most 6-year-old girls want to grow up to be a princess, or something equally as feminine. I, on the other hand, wanted to be a spy.

Every young child aspires to grow up and be something great, and I am no exception. However, most 6-year-old girls want to grow up to be a princess, or something equally as feminine. I, on the other hand, wanted to be a spy.

When I was in first or second grade, my favorite book was "Harriet the Spy" by Louise Fitzhugh. I aspired to be just like Harriet M. Welsch when I turned 11 years old, so I began my preparations around the age of seven: I gathered household items (rubber gloves, a pocket mirror, rubber bands and a few others made the list) and fashioned my own "spy belt." I found ripped up jeans, sneakers, a plain white T-shirt and my old fall jacket (this ensemble became the "spy clothes" that replaced my school clothes every afternoon).

I started writing down everything I saw, walking up and down the block, hiding conspicuously in neighbors' bushes and behind cars. I was an altered image of Harriet, and I loved it.

I'm sure my friends made fun of me, or laughed at me behind my back (honestly, who wouldn't?), but I don't recall it ever really bothering me. As long as I thought no one noticed that I was attempting to document every move, it didn't matter.

Spying was only the beginning. Though I was unaware of it at the time, through this and other childhood endeavors, I was beginning to work toward my future career as a journalist.

The Kid's News was the first publication I was involved in, run by me (the editor) and my best friend at the time, my only reporter. At this point in my life, I had already decided to be a writer, and so The Kid's News was born. We produced almost a year's worth of monthly issues ranging from four to six pages each.

In its heyday, The Kid's News recorded everything - from Mother's Day celebrations to vacations, jokes, usually unanswered surveys, and annual updates about the lives of our neighbors.

The most memorable experience I had while working on The Kid's News occurred when a tree fell on a house down the block. My single reporter and I ran down the sidewalk, pens and paper in hand, to get the details for the next issue before we took the paper to "the press," otherwise known as my printer.

At the age of 9, I single-handedly conducted an interview with the Bexley's mayor at the time. I felt like I was a real journalist - an investigative reporter.

Since my interview with the mayor, I've worked on my "investigative" side and my writing/reporting side, which brings me to today. I'm 17 years old, and the Harriet the Spy wannabe writer inside of me is still here, just older, more mature and ready for the world outside of a neighborhood "spy route."

Katlin Hiller, a senior at Bexley High School, is the news editor of the school newspaper, The Torch.