During a Nov. 18 meeting at Bexley High School, Capital University representatives, city of Bexley officials and residents vowed to work together on planned enhancements to Capital's Bernlohr Stadium that each group could live with.

During a Nov. 18 meeting at Bexley High School, Capital University representatives, city of Bexley officials and residents vowed to work together on planned enhancements to Capital's Bernlohr Stadium that each group could live with.

Capital initially brought its proposal for adding lighting and a new sound system to the stadium to the city's Planning Commission April 22.

The university withdrew the proposal in June after residents expressed concerns about noise, congestion and safety. The university submitted a revised proposal in October and later asked that it be tabled as well in order to gather more community input.

During the Nov. 18 meeting, representatives from Capital, the city and the South Bexley Neighborhood Association agreed to form a work group that would evaluate if the stadium enhancements can move forward while addressing the community's concerns.

Bexley Mayor Ben Kessler said the city will conduct a study on how Capital's plans for the stadium would affect surrounding neighborhoods.

"We are currently working (on) a traffic study with a traffic engineer, a use-intensity study, a lighting study and a sound study," Kessler said.

The city does not, however, currently have plans to conduct a study about what impact Capital's plans might have on property values of nearby homes, as some residents have requested, Kessler said.

"Without the benefit of these other studies, any sort of market assessment really is not possible," he said.

Capital University Athletic Director Steve Bruning said the purpose of the proposed stadium enhancements is to enhance the student experience, not to boost revenue for the university.

"We do not generate revenue from ticket sales," he said. "This is not going to be a revenue-generator. ... This is about the student-athlete experience. As part of that, we need additional practice time, extend the playing time, especially so that parents can get to the games in the evenings."

Francis Avenue resident David Greene, who is a member of the South Bexley Neighborhood Association, said he's optimistic that Capital, the city and residents can find a workable solution through a collaborative effort.

"Capital has everything to gain, the residents have everything to gain," he said. "And it doesn't end with one meeting or 10 meetings. It's ongoing."

At its Dec. 2 monthly meeting at the Bexley Public Library, the South Bexley Neighborhood Association is scheduled to select representatives who will work with Capital and the city on the stadium plan.

No timeline has been established for when the newly formed work group will begin its task or when the city's traffic, light, sound and intensity studies will be completed.