The science of robotics is constantly developing and students are often catalysts of this development. For the Bexley robotics team, Gearonimo, science is not only used in the classroom, but outside to help them increase their knowledge in the field of robotics technology.

The science of robotics is constantly developing and students are often catalysts of this development. For the Bexley robotics team, Gearonimo, science is not only used in the classroom, but outside to help them increase their knowledge in the field of robotics technology.

The team, in its third year, provides a way for students to use and develop their skills in the disciplines of Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics or STEM.

Jonah Stuber, a senior co-captain of the team, said school alumni have played a factor with mentorship and in using their professional careers to help the team.

"It teaches us how to apply what we're learning to see how it can be used in the real world," said sophomore Jess Stuber.

The robotics team does not just create its own robots, members also serve the elementary schools by tutoring younger students in their STEM pursuits and projects. Fifth- and sixth-graders participate in the First Lego League and the team worked with the students on the programming and building of robots.

Former team captain Parker Murphy, class of 2015, said the program helped to teach him how to work with others in a team setting.

Jonah Stuber said he attributes his success to his completion of the extensive STEM curriculum offered by the high school, and the program and team have allowed him to become a better student.

"It gave him something else to be passionate about," Jess Stuber said.

As a young team, the greatest need is funding and mentorship. The team does not have any corporate or school sponsorship, so their donations come from community members.

"We need mentors, people who can help us with the design process and the building of the actual robot itself," Nathan Brownstein, a senior, said.

Earlier this year, Stuber testified in front of the Ohio Senate Education Finance Subcommittee on behalf of the Ohio First Foundation for a $4 million grant for the funding of robotics teams throughout the state. The team has also developed a partnership with Columbus College of Art and Design that begins next year. CCAD will provide more design experience for the team.

The team has about 15 active members.