The 2015 Columbus Jewish Film Festival runs Sunday, Nov. 1, through Nov. 12 at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Columbus, 1125 College Ave., and the Drexel Theatre, 2254 E. Main St.

The 2015 Columbus Jewish Film Festival runs Sunday, Nov. 1, through Nov. 12 at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Columbus, 1125 College Ave., and the Drexel Theatre, 2254 E. Main St.

A program of the JCC, the festival will feature documentaries and narrative films designed to appeal to various audiences, said Emily Schuss, the festival's director.

"The one thing I try to emphasize every year is the Jewish Film Festival is not just for Jewish people," she said. "We have a large international representation. The term 'Jewish' doesn't mean there's a Jewish theme in each film. The films are for everybody."

Schuss said she and the festival's steering committee narrow down the selections from a field of 50 to 100 films each year.

"We try to find 12 to 13 films that work with our schedule," she said. "We try to have a nice balance with happy, sad, current affairs -- a good selection."

The festival opens at 7 p.m. Nov. 1 at the JCC with Once in a Lifetime, a film based on the true story of Anne Gueguen, a French high school history teacher who changed the lives of her most troubled students through Holocaust education.

One of the highlights of the festival will be Doc Sunday, an annual tradition that will be held Nov. 8 at the Drexel Theatre with four documentary features beginning with Look At Us Now, Mother at 11:30 a.m. The screening will be followed by a discussion with director Gayle Kirschenbaum. She will answer questions about her film, which examines the transformation of a tumultuous mother-daughter relationship to that of acceptance and love.

"She's coming from New York to be our guest speaker," Schuss said of Kirschenbaum.

"Doc Sunday" also will feature a discussion following the documentary The Armor of Light, which will be screened at 2:30 p.m. The film is the directorial debut of Abigail Disney, great-niece of Walt Disney. The film follows the journey of evangelical minister Rob Schenck, who preaches about the toll of gun violence in America.

Immediately after the film, Rabbi Michael Ungar of local synagogue Congregation Tifereth Israel will lead a question-and-answer session with the audience.

"Clergy feel very strongly that they have a responsibility to speak about gun control," Schuss said.

One of the films featured in this year's festival, Band of Bowlers, has a local connection. The short film by Columbus native Ryan Vesler will be shown at 7 p.m. Monday, Nov. 2, at the JCC.

Band of Bowlers features the I.M. Harris B'nai B'rith Bowling League that was formed almost 85 years ago and is one of the oldest leagues in Columbus.

Band of Bowlers offers an opportunity to view a film about an organization that is unique to central Ohio, Schuss said.

"There's not always a film that has a local connection," she said. "This is rare."

For tickets and more information, call 614-559-6205.