Two athletes at St. Charles Preparatory School signed letters of intent last month to continue their careers at out-of-state Division I colleges.

Two athletes at St. Charles Preparatory School signed letters of intent last month to continue their careers at out-of-state Division I colleges.

Senior Charlie Macias signed to play soccer at the University of Evansville in Indiana and senior Jourdan Wickliffe will play football at Eastern Illinois in Charleston, Ill.

Macias, a Westerville resident, led the St. Charles soccer team with nine goals last season. He also led the Cardinals with nine goals as a junior.

"On the athletics side, I like the coach (Mike Jacobs) and what he had say about their style of play," Macias said. "(The Purple Aces) play a 4-4-3 set and that allows the back to get up on the attack. That fits my style of play."

Macias expects to move from his high school position of forward to left back with Evansville.

"Charlie really fits the mold of what we look for in wide players - he has great speed and is an excellent server of the ball," Jacobs told GoPurpleAces.com. "He can be a dynamic attacking player on the flanks."

Macias plays left back for the Crew Soccer Academy and has played for Team Ohio COSA.

"The college game is a lot different. It's much more physical," Macias said. "I have been training with the Columbus Crew Academy and that should prepare me for what I will see at the Division I level."

St. Charles finished 5-12 overall last fall after losing to Pickerington North 3-0 in the second round of the Division I district tournament. The Cardinals were 2-2 in the CCL to finish behind co-champions DeSales and Hartley (3-0-1) and ahead of Watterson (1-3) and Ready (0-4).

"Charlie is quicker than anyone I have ever coached," St. Charles coach Richard Ey said. "For being an undersized guy (5-foot-8, 150 pounds), he is really physical and he doesn't get pushed around."

Macias has a 3.8 GPA and wants to study business at Evansville.

"I liked the small-campus atmosphere and it's rated as one of the top universities in the Midwest. They also have a strong business program," Macias said. "They also have advisers who will help you stay organized academically when you are traveling and they have a good academic support group for athletes."

Wickliffe chose Eastern Illinois over two Mid-American Conference schools, Akron and Ohio.

"I really like the people at Eastern Illinois, the coach (Bob Spoo), it just had a nice, homey feel to it and they run a spread (offense) similar to what we ran in high school," Wickliffe said. "At the beginning of my junior year, I messed up my ankle and they were there through thick and thin when the other schools started to cool off. They stuck with me and I liked that."

Wickliffe, who lives on the east side of Columbus, was special mention all-state and first-team all-district in Division II as a defensive back last fall thanks to four interceptions, but he also was a dual offensive threat. He caught 18 passes for 276 yards and five touchdowns and rushed for 546 yards and 10 touchdowns.

The 6-0, 190-pounder was first team all-league as the Cardinals reached the playoffs for the first time since 2002. St. Charles lost to host Uniontown Lake 41-14 in the opening round to finish 5-5 overall.

"Jourdan is a very versatile player. I figure they could put him in about seven positions on the field and he would be successful," St. Charles coach Jeff Pharion said. "He could play any of their defensive back positions or any of their wide receiver spots as well as being a kick or punt returner or even a tailback. I'm sure the coaches will find the position that's the best fit for Jourdan and the team."

Wickliffe said Eastern Illinois coaches want him to get stronger before joining the Panthers, a member of the Ohio Valley Conference that competes in the Football Championship Subdivision, formerly Division I-AA.

"They wanted me to work on my legs," Wickliffe said. "They want me to come in and play wide receiver, but I'm also open to playing at defensive back if receiver doesn't work out."