In today's world, young people have the opportunity to try a myriad of activities in which they could find success. An elementary school or early junior high student has lots of decisions to make and this week the student-athletes writing in my summer series give advice for those interested in beginning the activity in which they excel.

In today's world, young people have the opportunity to try a myriad of activities in which they could find success. An elementary school or early junior high student has lots of decisions to make and this week the student-athletes writing in my summer series give advice for those interested in beginning the activity in which they excel.

Drew Dosch, Canal Winchester baseball: "The biggest thing in learning how to be good in baseball is to work hard and be dedicated to the sport. Success comes with a long process and never think it will come overnight, but understand that you can't get better at anything by sitting at home watching television or playing video games. You have to be out there working at your sport."

Paige Myers, Grove City softball: "My best advice is to never give up and always listen to your parents and coaches. When they try to help you it is only in your best interest. Follow this reading -- Philippians 4:13. "You can do all things through Christ who strengthens you."

Alex Coccia, St. Charles fencing: "I guess my best advice would be to contact me and come to our club and watch practice. I would encourage any young student to not only do that, but to suit up, join in practice and try fencing out."

Sandy Whitaker, St. Charles swimming: "I would encourage students to have fun with swimming. As you age, you will know if you are good and can increase the intensity of your work, but never stop having fun."

Christiana Raymond, Columbus Academy tennis: "I would also stress having fun with your sport. You must avoid burnout, so don't overdo tennis. You start fundamentally with learning your ground strokes and then putting spin on them. But while you are learning these skills, practice with a friend. It makes everything more enjoyable."

J.D. Weatherspoon, Northland basketball: "I would emphasize that you should practice basketball every day and never take days off. But at the same time, I would emphasize that you must keep up with your schoolwork because it will take you farther than any sport. Also with basketball, watch it on television and learn from great players."

Alex Rogers, Dublin Coffman ice hockey: "The best piece of advice I can give to a young hockey player is to be a team player and never quit. Always try your hardest and just have fun doing it."

Jenna Shiner, Olentangy Liberty bowling: "No matter how successful at bowling you are at first, stick with it and be respectful of the sport. Bowling can always use athletes so there are plenty of chances. But what is important when you become good at any sport is to continually set new goals and seek to fulfill them."

Gracie Finnegan, Watterson swimming: "I would tell someone who is starting the sport of swimming to get ready and give it your all. Swimming has been an amazing ride for me, and if you put the work in, the sport can take you to amazing places."

Next week, the student-athletes talk about what they enjoy most about their sport.

I'll see you at a game.