Canal Winchester High School student Andrew Cargill said he was "completely floored" to learn a photo he shot won the 7th Congressional District Art Show and will hang in the U.S. Capitol for the next year.

Canal Winchester High School student Andrew Cargill said he was "completely floored" to learn a photo he shot won the 7th Congressional District Art Show and will hang in the U.S. Capitol for the next year.

"I didn't think I would place, much less win," he said.

The Congressional Art Competition began in 1982 to encourage and recognize young artists across the county. More than 650,000 high school students have been involved in the competition.

"The Ghost and the Body" is a black-and-white photograph of plastic animals. Cargill manipulated the photo in the high school darkroom and added a second, inverted version next to the original photo.

"With most art, you try to be as vibrant as possible," he said. "With black-and-white photography, you get contrasts which really draw the eye to it. With black and white, you focus on the subject more.

"I enjoy looking at different perspectives and trying see things differently."

Even before his family moved to Canal Winchester from Gainesville, Fla., five years ago, Cargill said he was taking family photos with a digital camera.

"I didn't start doing darkroom photography till sophomore year" at Canal Winchester High School, he said.

When Cargill became a finalist in the Congressional art contest, he said was flattered but knew he couldn't attend the announcement of the winner at the Ohio Glass Museum in Lancaster because of a scheduling conflict: He was in a school play.The Monday before the announcement, U.S. Rep. Steve Austria's office (R-Beavercreek) called the Cargills to tell them Andrew had won.

His parents, however, didn't tell their son.

"We had to keep it quiet all week," Linda Cargill said. "It was excitement for us all week, and hard to keep quiet."

The night of the announcement, Cargill was pulled into the school library before the start of the play. There was a computer set up with a live feed to the Ohio Glass Museum, where Cargill could see his parents, Austria, and everyone else at the announcement.

Cargill won a trophy, a $500 savings bond and $1,500 in scholarships. He will fly to Washington, D.C., in June for the national art contest.

Linda Cargill said she is proud of her son.

"It's one of those hidden talents as parents you find out your child has," she said.

Cargill will be a senior at CWHS in the fall and doesn't know yet where he will attend college. But he already has a major in mind: French.

"I originally wanted to go to school for advertising art," he said. "I want to go for French language to do translations, but I'll definitely continue drawing and doing photography my whole life.