The Canal Winchester Landmarks Commission got a look at the proposed color scheme for Town Hall's new storm windows at its meeting Monday.

The Canal Winchester Landmarks Commission got a look at the proposed color scheme for Town Hall's new storm windows at its meeting Monday.

Construction services manager Bill Sims said the new off-white color is similar to what's on the building now, but portions of the structure have turned white because of exposure to sunlight.

"It is an off-white that matches closely what you see there now," he said.

"There was no action for Landmarks to take yesterday," Sims said. "We simply were showing them the intended color for the new storm windows. They seemed to like it."

Village officials expect to open bids Sept. 1 to replace and renovate 28 windows in the historic Town Hall.

The project is estimated to cost $54,000. The village budgeted $35,000 for the work last year and received a $24,032 preservation grant from the Ohio Historical Society.

Sims said the project is currently being advertised for bids. The bid opening is scheduled for 9 a.m. Sept. 1. He said he hopes to take a recommendation to council on Sept. 7 for approval.

According to the bid sheet on the village's Web site, work is to be completed within 60 calendar days once the contract is awarded.

The project includes replacing the storm windows and otherwise refurbishing the historic structure's windows. It also calls for painting both the doors and windows, public works director Matt Peoples said.

"We actually have a missing pane of glass in the existing storm windows," he said. "(The windows) are very unsightly."

Because the building is in Canal Winchester's historic district, Sims said officials wanted to comply with the village's own rules so the windows were approved by the Landmarks Commission. The paint color didn't need commission approval but village officials wanted to keep the commission up to date, he said.

"Town hall is an important historic structure for the village," he said. "We want to keep everyone informed."

The most significant approval came from the Ohio Historical Society's preservation office. The OHS approved materials, architect's proposal and even the request for proposal for the architect, Sims said. Earlier this month, the Ohio Historical Society approved materials and the technical specifications for the work.

"There are a lot of steps in their approval process," he said.