The railroad tracks that cross Gender Road in Canal Winchester are "failing," according to public works director Matt Peoples, but getting them fixed depends on money the rail company doesn't have.

The railroad tracks that cross Gender Road in Canal Winchester are "failing," according to public works director Matt Peoples, but getting them fixed depends on money the rail company doesn't have.

Peoples told Canal Winchester Village Council on Feb. 21 officials with the railroad - which he later identified as the Indiana and Ohio Railway - have acknowledged that there are problems with the tracks but have told the village there is no money for repairs.

Peoples said village officials met with railroad engineers at the crossing, near Canal Street. He said the engineers indicated "with some confidence the crossing is failing."

Any repairs to the tracks would also involve a three- to four-day closure of Gender Road.

"Gender Road is not closed easily," Peoples said.

It will be a struggle if the 18,000 vehicles that drive on Gender each day have to be detoured, he said.

"That is a lot to reroute, especially truck traffic bus traffic," Peoples said.

The tracks were laid in 1997 or 1998, he said. The problem is that a section of rubber used at the crossing is failing, Peoples said. A short-term solution would involve removing and replacing the rubber.

"They said they no longer use (the rubber) and it probably shouldn't have been put there," Peoples said, adding the material is better served on a low-lying street like Trine Street.

Madison Township Assistant Fire Chief Robert Bates said department officials believe the rough tracks are causing wear and tear on the springs on department vehicles.

"We obviously travel over the tracks every day," he said. "The crossing is kind of rough."

Mershon asked if there were a cost estimate to fix the tracks. Peoples said there is none at this point since village officials only recently met with railroad representatives.

"We need to figure out what is the repair and how long it would take," he said.

Mayor Michael Ebert said he wasn't in favor of a temporary solution for the problem.

"It could be another 15 years before we get them to look," he said. "I think we should look at something permanent."

Mershon asked who is responsible for fixing the issues at the crossing and if there would be anything the village would have to pay for. Peoples said the answer depends on how quickly the railway company could identify funding to fix the tracks. He said the village is working with Madison Township to identify some grants.