Fourteen people have submitted applications to be Canal Winchester's fifth economic development director.

The city extended the original June 14 deadline to June 21 in an effort to attract more candidates, but received no additional resumes by the later date.

Nancy Stir, the city's part-time human resources officer, has extensive human resources experience with the state and is used to dealing with greater numbers.

"We would have 200 to 500 applicants (for state jobs)," she said.

The position opened up in the past month when Chris Strayer announced he had accepted a post with the Ohio Department of Development, which is undergoing a privatization process promoted by Gov. John Kasich.

Finance director Nanisa Osborne said she had expected the city to draw a larger pool of applicants than it would as a village, because cities have greater development powers under Ohio law.

"This will be a little different," Osborn said. "For one thing, some people who do this kind of work do not want to work for a village because development in a city has different tools. That was not necessarily true for us, because even though we were a village, we were a charter community, but that was a nuance that a lot of people did not necessarily understand."

Osborn and Strayer said the city has enjoyed respectable development even during down economic times.

"Canal Winchester has had a lot of development over the last four years not a lot, but some," Osborn said. "Many communities have not been so fortunate. That helps demonstrate the community is viable."

She said some current development officials in other communities had expressed interest, but were reluctant to apply because candidates' names become public record.

"I've had two people call me and tell me they might be interested in the job, but they don't want their current employer to know they are looking," Osborn said. "So they don't want to send a resume if they don't have a chance of getting the job. I'm sorry, but that's not something I can help with."

The applicants are:

Skip Allman, Mansfield, until May 11 was executive director of the United Way for Richland County. He studied journalism at the University of Oklahoma.

Benjamin Amick, Gahanna, until May was a funding specialist for Bird Houk consultants. He earned a master's degree in public administration from the University of Akron.

Gary M. Beggrow, Marietta, Ga., until March 2011, was a manager with Bee Line Aligning Service. He attended Ohio Dominican University, studying business administration.

James Carmean, Columbus, former administrative aide for the Ohio House of Representatives. He earned a master's degree in public administration from the Ohio State University.

Susan E. Crotty, Obetz, former development services director for the city of Pickerington. She earned a bachelor of arts degree in economics from The Ohio State University.

Eric T. Fischer of Gahanna, development planner for the city of Powell. He earned a master's degree in city and regional planning from The Ohio State University

Brent T. Foley, Canal Winchester, operating principal, TRIAD Architects. He earned a master of architecture degree from the University of Cincinnati.

Scott Fulton, Canal Winchester, planner with the Franklin County Economic Development and Planning Department. He earned a master's degree in geography from the University of Toledo.

Lucas Haire, Columbus, development director for the city of Reynoldsburg. He earned a bachelor of arts degree in geography from the Ohio State University.

Bruce A. Langner, Westerville, director of planning and economic development for the city of Bexley. He earned a master's degree in city and regional planning from The Ohio State University.

Sean M. Robare, Canal Winchester, project manager for Woda Construction Inc. He attended Kent State University to study architecture and structural engineering.

Carmen Sauer, Columbus, director of development, Corpus Christi and St. Ladislas Catholic churches.

Evan Scurti, Ashland, director of the Ashland Area Council for Economic Development. He earned a master's degree in city and regional planning from The Ohio State University

Jim Smallwood, Pickerington, has energy and utility experience with Owens Corning and other firms. He earned a master's degree in business administration from Clemson University.