"Picking," glamourized by reality television shows in which ambitious garbage sleuths scour through trash in hopes of finding treasure, won't be allowed in Groveport if city officials have their way.

"Picking," glamourized by reality television shows in which ambitious garbage sleuths scour through trash in hopes of finding treasure, won't be allowed in Groveport if city officials have their way.

Legislation now before Groveport City Council would make it illegal for individuals to go on either private or public property in the city and rummage or scavenge through trash. The city's police department would be charged with enforcing the legislation.

The ordinance, sponsored by Councilman Ed Rarey, is expected to have a third reading and final vote at council's Sept. 10 meeting.

"We would like some regulations in place to keep people from coming in and picking through trash. Things are thrown about and maybe something gets taken that (the property owner) doesn't want taken," City Administrator Marsha Hall said.

Police Chief Ralph Portier addressed another reason behind the proposed ordinance at council's committee of the whole meeting on Aug. 20.

"We have limited amount of space in alleys and right of ways. The need (for the legislation) is that people will go through trash to get personal information," he said.

Councilwoman Jan Stoots added that the ordinance will reduce litter in the city as well.

"Also, if they're picking, they may make a mess of what they're doing and not pick it up," she said.

However, Councilwoman Jean Ann Hilbert questioned the need for such an ordinance.

"Once I put it out there in the right of way, I could care less what happens to it. It's not mine any more. it is public domain," she said.

City resident Matt Campbell told council he supports the ordinance.

"I live near Mr. Rarey. I have personally run people off who claim they're 'pickers,'" he said. "The serious part of this is there is a criminal element. We have elderly people that don't have access to shredders. I appreciate (that) Mr. Rarey brought this up."

Rarey said the legislation, if approved, would put control back into the hands of the city.

"If the police see someone in these alleys, they'll tell them to move on. We should make these people aware there are rules and regulations," he said.