For a year, in 2005, Keith Beveridge and his wife, Jane, took custody of Justin, a 16-year-old boy with muscular dystrophy who was an avid Boston Red Sox fan and a talented drawer.

For a year, in 2005, Keith Beveridge and his wife, Jane, took custody of Justin, a 16-year-old boy with muscular dystrophy who was an avid Boston Red Sox fan and a talented drawer.

Justin, who had moved in with another family after the Beveridges moved from New England to Columbus, passed away in 2006.

Keith Beveridge now spends his days training for the Pittsburgh Marathon in May. Through his training, he plans to raise money for research for muscular dystrophy, in honor of Justin.

"It just feels like the right thing to do," Beveridge said.

The Beveridges learned Justin's story as Jane Beveridge taught him for two years at a school in Vermont, where they were living at the time.

Justin had a bad home situation and his siblings had been removed from his home, but authorities were having a hard time finding a home for Justin because he would need 24-hour care.

"They had tried all of his life to take him out of his home, and they were never successful," Keith Beveridge said.

The Beveridges finally decided to offer themselves as foster parents after hearing continually about Justin's difficult living situation.

"He was in a rough home," Beveridge said. "(Jane) would come home on a daily basis just heartbroken."

For the year that Justin lived with the Beveridges, they took him to a Red Sox game and to visit family in Pittsburgh and Columbus. Before that, he had never left Vermont.

Despite everything Justin had gone through at home, Keith Beveridge said he was always upbeat and smiling.

"Justin was so kind, and he always made us laugh," Beveridge said. "This kid, who came from a rough home and couldn't take care of himself, could always make you laugh."

Beveridge said he lists leaving Justin behind when he moved to Columbus as his only regret.

After Justin's death, he said he felt the need to do something, but wasn't sure what.

After two years, Beveridge, who began running about 10 years ago for health reasons, decided to raise money through a marathon. He has competed in three triathlons and began running half marathons in 2004.

The Pittsburgh Marathon, scheduled for May 3, would be his first.

To raise money, Beveridge is reaching out to everyone he knows and asking for donations of $1.

"I know a lot of people give a lot of money to different organizations," Beveridge said. "Who doesn't have a dollar, just $1?"

His goal is to raise $2,600, or $100 for each mile in a marathon.

"I just thought, sort of one person at a time, we could raise $2,600," he said.

Beveridge has reached out primarily to friends so far, but he plans to pass out information at churches and at the schools both he and his wife have worked at, and to go door-to-door through his neighborhood to talk to people about his efforts.

He also has launched a Web site, www.runningforjustin.org, which lays out his plans, tells people how they can contribute and talks about his inspiration for running.

Despite training through the winter months for the first time, Beveridge said he's confident he'll be ready for the marathon in May. He'll continue to work toward his goal over the next few months, training around Clintonville, pushing his 1-year-old son, Eli, in front of him.

Following the Pittsburgh Marathon, Beveridge said he would like to continue to raise money for muscular dystrophy in Justin's honor as he competes in other races. He's scheduled to compete in a half Ironman race in August.

"I would like to keep this going and continue to raise money $1 at a time," Beveridge said.