As the Clintonville Area Commission waits for Columbus City Council to put its stamp of approval on the area's neighborhood plan, commissioners are looking at how to implement the plan.

As the Clintonville Area Commission waits for Columbus City Council to put its stamp of approval on the area's neighborhood plan, commissioners are looking at how to implement the plan.

City council heard a first reading of legislation to approve the plan Monday night. The plan is expected to be approved at the next council meeting March 2.

Commissioners Paul Harris and Chris Gawronski were scheduled to lead a discussion on which of the plan's action steps to work on this year during the commission's planning and development meeting this week.

"All of the things on the action plan are things that we would like to do, but there are a lot of things on that list, so we're going to have to do something first," Gawronski said.

Gawronski said the planning and development committee will look to identify three to four steps to work on this year. The steps identified as priorities will be taken before the CAC at its meeting March 5 to make sure the CAC agrees with those priorities.

The CAC will discuss priorities further, Gawronski said, if the planning and development committee is unable to come up with a consensus.

Gawronski said no official discussion on implementing the plan has taken place, but through the public input process to develop the plan, some issues stood out as community priorities, such as implementing the Indianola Corridor Plan developed a few years ago.

"There's interest in transportation issues and implementing the overlays or changing where the overlays apply," Gawronski said.

The city will take some roll in helping the neighborhood to implement elements of the plan, said Christine Palmer, the Columbus senior planner who helped develop the plan. However, she said implementation will fall largely with the community.

"They really carry the load of the work," Palmer said.

The city's planning department likely will meet with the area commission a few times a year to talk about what's being done to work on the plan, Palmer said. City planners who helped develop the document also likely will help steer community leaders to the right people to help implement certain steps.

"We work with other neighborhoods; we've been through a lot of the same objectives," Palmer said.

In addition to seeking some public input on which elements of the plan to implement first, Gawronski said the CAC also will look for community members or groups willing to volunteer to work toward implementing some of the steps.

"That just expands our capability of doing more things at once," Gawronski said.

jnesbitt@thisweeknews.com