Just how many members of the Clintonville Area Commission will be on hand for the group's next meeting (at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 3, in the Whetstone Library) seems to be anybody's guess.

Just how many members of the Clintonville Area Commission will be on hand for the group's next meeting (at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 3, in the Whetstone Library) seems to be anybody's guess.

Chairwoman D Searcy said that she has no idea.

Two members of the advisory panel, District 2's Chris Gawronski and Paul Harris, representing District 6, had previously announced their intentions to resign before their terms expired. Harris planned to relocate to Virginia while Gawronski was moving to the United Arab Emirates.

Neither had indicated an exact timeframe for departing, but Searcy said this week that she had fully expected to hear from both of them by now.

"I have not, and wouldn't you think I would?" she said. "I don't know what's going on.

"I just thought I would have received something by now."

Calls placed to Gawronski's home phone number are greeted with the message: "The number you have reached has been disconnected or is no longer in service."

The home number for Harris gets the recording: "We're sorry, your call did not go through."

Typically, commissioners call the chair to let him or her know "as a courtesy" if they're going to be absent, Searcy said.

Commission members who miss three meetings in a row can be removed by a vote of the remaining members, she said.

"That would be a long time to do that, so I'm hoping that the two commissioners will go ahead and tender their resignations," she said. "As soon as I find something out I'll let people know."

On the Sept. 3 meeting's agenda, Searcy said there should be discussion of resurrecting a task force to bring some relief to train-whistle troubled residents off Weber Road and Lincoln Avenue.

Previous efforts, one dating to the 1990s and the other taking place about five years ago, have sought to alleviate trains from blasting whistles in residential parts of Clintonville, Searcy said.

The more recent, she added, got as far as recommending the use of whistles that direct their sound down the tracks and not in a full circle.

"But I don't think anything ever came of that," Searcy said.