Clintonville as a community continues to be short-changed by the city of Columbus when it comes to enlightened, progressive and thoughtful urban planning and revitalization.

Clintonville as a community continues to be short-changed by the city of Columbus when it comes to enlightened, progressive and thoughtful urban planning and revitalization.

It is disconcerting that as the highest tax base in the city, the residents of this community read week after week about the innovative and community-friendly changes going on in Weiland Park, Merion Village, Old North Columbus, Franklinton, Downtown and other areas while Clintonville is being saddled with a 1960s era "roadway improvement" on East North Broadway.

In January, February, March and April 2009, the Department of Public Service attempted to cram down an intersection plan at North Broadway and High Streets that involves removing trees and green space and encroaching on 40-percent of three residential front yards on East North Broadway, a historic street that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Wisely, the community rejected this plan and instead came together to create a vision for a "complete street" similar to what we are seeing throughout Columbus. This plan was designed to enhance and not destroy our environment. It was designed to create a town center and improve walkability and bikeability throughout the area. It was designed to protect the integrity of this historic street and most importantly, it was designed to ensure the safety of the 1,000 children who are on or cross North Broadway each school day.

The response from the city now, almost two years later is, "tough luck, Clintonville, we are on our way and there's nothing you can do about it."

When challenged on this attitude and approach, there is no doubt the city officials will spend time shedding "crocodile tears," lamenting their lack of funds (which seem to be plentiful when the mayor has a pet project), claiming their "victimhood" in the face of the recession and generally wringing their hands about their inability to do something that makes sense.

The real victims here are the residents of Clintonville who pay the salaries of these people, who spend their time and talent in many ways to keep this a thriving and forward-thinking community. It is the residents of Clintonville for whom the tears should be shedÉ and the tears should be real.