Wholly Craft, 3169 N. High St., will be celebrating the garden harvest season with an exhibit and reception designed to encourage local gardening and raise money for community gardening projects.

Wholly Craft, 3169 N. High St., will be celebrating the garden harvest season with an exhibit and reception designed to encourage local gardening and raise money for community gardening projects.

The Victory Garden of Tomorrow poster series by artist Joe Wirtheim will be on display through Aug. 26. Wirtheim is a former Columbus resident now living in Portland, Ore.

In his work, according to Wholly Craft owner Olivera Bratich, Wirtheim "channels the aesthetics of historical poster propaganda to send modern messages about food and consumption."

"While World War II era posters encouraged Americans to grow Victory Gardens to reduce reliance on war rations, Wirtheim considers his series to provide 'artful advocacy for the modern home front,'" according to Bratich.

Exhibited posters will be available for purchase for $15 to $30.

Throughout the exhibit, Wholly Craft will also be selling T-shirts to benefit local community gardening organizations. Adult T-shirts with the slogans "Support Community Gardening" and "Think Globally, Garden Locally" and children-sized "Ohio Grown" T-shirts will be available for $10, with all proceeds benefiting the Godman Guild's Weinland Park Community Garden and Local Matters.

The exhibit will close on Friday, Aug. 26, with a reception featuring foods harvested from gardens and farms in central Ohio and a presentation by local community gardening experts Trish Dehnbostel and Yolanda Moser.

Moser, garden and wellness coordinator at the Godman Guild, will discuss her work in Weinland Park engaging neighborhood teenagers in gardening and community-building projects. Dehnbostel serves as director of healthful food access at Local Matters and oversees over 70 local community gardens. She'll explore different gardening methods, answer questions about starting a garden and explore opportunities for involvement in local community gardening projects.

The link between shopping locally and eating locally makes sense, according to Bratich.

"All of these eat-local, buy-local movements are advocating for the same thing: localized economies that offer meaningful jobs to workers and healthful, sustainable products to consumers," she wrote in announcing the exhibit. "We love being able to provide the community with fun, handmade gifts year-round and we jumped at the chance to highlight some of the great work our friends in the gardening community are doing."

The closing reception is free and open to the public.