The Wounded Warrior Project for which Columbus resident Justin Kuhel is raising money on a nearly 400-mile walk to Arlington National Cemetery, was established in 2003 in Roanoke, Va.

The Wounded Warrior Project for which Columbus resident Justin Kuhel is raising money on a nearly 400-mile walk to Arlington National Cemetery, was established in 2003 in Roanoke, Va.

According to a fact sheet on the website of the organization, it relocated its headquarters to Jacksonville, Fla., in 2006.

"What started as a program to provide comfort items to wounded service members has grown into a complete rehabilitative effort to assist warriors as they recover and transition back to civilian life," the website says.

The purpose of the project is:

• To raise awareness and enlist the public's aid for the needs of injured service members.

• To help injured service members aid and assist each other.

• To provide unique, direct programs and services to meet the needs of injured service members.

The organization's efforts are focused on military personnel who incurred service-related injuries on or after Sept. 11, 2001.

The programs the Wounded Warrior Project offers are needed, the site continues, because of the large number of military members returning from combat with injuries.

"With advancements in battlefield medicine and body armor, an unprecedented percentage of service members are surviving severe wounds or injuries," according to the website information. "For every U.S. soldier killed in World Wars I and II, there were 1.7 soldiers wounded. In Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, for every U.S. soldier killed, seven are wounded.

"Combined, there have been almost 42,000 injured in the two conflicts, nearly 32,000 injured in Operation Iraqi Freedom and nearly 10,000 in Operation Enduring Freedom. ... Offering a variety of programs and services, WWP is equipped to serve warriors with every type of injury, from the physical to the invisible wounds of war."

More information is available at woundedwarriorproject. org.

Kevin Parks/ThisWeek