Clintonville Area Commission education committee chairwoman Susan Gaunce plans to reach out to Northland Community Council president Emmanuel V. Remy to see if the pair can collaborate on issues of interest to both neighborhoods.

Clintonville Area Commission education committee chairwoman Susan Gaunce plans to reach out to Northland Community Council president Emmanuel V. Remy to see if the pair can collaborate on issues of interest to both neighborhoods.

The CAC education panel was formed in 2003. More recently, Remy made it one of his first priorities to establish an education committee in the Northland area.

"I'm really excited that other people are starting education committees," Gaunce said last week.

In Clintonville, the impetus for launching a committee under the auspices of the CAC was similar to that of the much more recently formed Clintonville Go Public: to halt the migration of families with young children from the neighborhood to the suburbs, where the perception is the schools are better.

"The reason we formed is to keep people from moving," Gaunce said. "So many people saw their friends moving when their kids were reaching school age.

"It's a really arduous decision. Parents have a lot of angst about where they're going to send their kids to school."

Remy's stated purpose in forming the NCC education committee was to bring together representatives from the public, private, parochial and charter schools in the area to find some common ground and work toward a common purpose.

Gaunce said she believes that effort might also bear fruit in Clintonville.

Remy recently proposed starting a student advisory committee of high school students who would be allowed to participate in and even vote at NCC sessions come fall.

That, too, might be worth exploring in Clintonville, said Gaunce, who spent a decade as a member of the area commission until she stepped down in 2009.

"Having student participation, that's not a bad idea," she said.

Since the Clintonville education group was established around nine years ago, the committee had created an update comparing test scores from students in suburban districts with those in the Columbus City Schools located within Clintonville as a means of helping parents who faced that "arduous decision."

"Our public schools do really well, and we just want people to be aware of that option," Gaunce said.

A school guide, with information supplied by all the educational facilities in the neighborhood, now is produced by the CAC committee, Gaunce said.

Member Mary Pajor saw something similar in Westerville and the Clintonville panelists decided to adopt the idea.

Another member, former CAC representative Mike McLaughlin, sends a form out to the schools each year asking for information about enrollment and any special programs offered, Gaunce said.

The first edition of the report, which is available online at the Clintonville Area Commission's website, came out in January.

"That has been one of our big, big projects," Gaunce said.

Along similar lines, the committee for the past seven years has held a Clintonville Elementary and Middle School Fair in January.