Although the WOSU Presents Columbus Neighborhoods program focusing on Clintonville won't be aired over the PBS station for more than a year, senior producer Mary Rathke already is looking for inspiration, information and imagery.

Although the WOSU Presents Columbus Neighborhoods program focusing on Clintonville won't be aired over the PBS station for more than a year, senior producer Mary Rathke already is looking for inspiration, information and imagery.

"What I do is when we look at a show at the beginning, I try to meet as many people as we can, find out who knows what," Rathke said last week.

She said photos and videos are especially vital to the visual medium, and re-enactments also have figured in some of the shows previously broadcast in the series.

"A lot of that drives the story," Rathke said.

The 59-minute programs on the history of neighborhoods already have featured the Short North Arts District, King-Lincoln, University District, German Village, downtown and Franklinton, and Olde Town East.

"I think the series is fabulous," said Clintonville Historical Society President Mary Rodgers.

Due for broadcast in 2013, Rathke said, will be the South Side in the spring, Bexley, Worthington, Grandview Heights, Upper Arlington and Marble Cliff together, and one program focusing not on a neighborhood but on immigration, from the very early days of settlers arriving up to the Somali and Bhutanese refugees of more recent times.

Rodgers said she already has met with Rathke and another producer and has shipped them a good deal of information about the neighborhood's past.

"She had already started pretty aggressively looking for additional contacts," Rodgers said. "She's on a mission."

In fact, according to the society president, a member of the WOSU Presents Columbus Neighborhoods production team stopped in at a meeting several years ago to find out what kind of archival materials the organization possessed, with an eye toward one day focusing the series on Clintonville. That provided the impetus, Rodgers said, for establishing an archive at St. James Episcopal Church and for collecting local historical photos for the Columbus Metropolitan Library.

Still, news that Clintonville would be one of the neighborhoods featured next year came as a surprise.

"We weren't expecting to arise to the occasion until 2015," Rodgers said. "When we heard it was going to be 2013, we were delighted. The entire society is just elated. I think it's going to be phenomenal to be able to see their compilation of the history of the neighborhood and then to have something we can hopefully use in the school system and have as part of our ongoing work.

"Hopefully, she'll be successful in gathering some things we just haven't been able to find but know are out there," Rodgers added.

"People have stuff squirreled away everywhere," Rathke said. "The problem is finding it. It's always in somebody's basement. It's finding those people is the difficulty in our work."

"They like to interview people who have personal stories to tell about their relatives or their personal story," Rodgers said. "If there's somebody who feels like they have a story, tell them to give me a call. If nothing else, it will end up in our archives, but it might actually make the TV program."

Those with information or material they feel might be of use to producers in preparing the Clintonville show may contact Rathke by calling WOSU-TV at 614-292-9679 or sending an email to Rathke@ wosu.org.