There's a lot of talk about getting around in Clintonville -- complaints might be the more-accurate term -- and now there's an opportunity to take action.

There's a lot of talk about getting around in Clintonville -- complaints might be the more-accurate term -- and now there's an opportunity to take action.

The members of the Clintonville Area Commission's planning and development committee will host a gathering Tuesday, Dec. 3, with that goal in mind.

The Clintonville Mobility Framework open house is set from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Dec. 3 at Clinton Heights Lutheran Church, 15 Clinton Heights Ave.

The committee is developing a mobility framework to address mobility, pedestrian safety and accessibility issues throughout Clintonville, said CAC Chairman Daniel B. Miller. The open house will let residents provide input on these issues, identify problem areas and discuss potential improvement projects and solutions.

"I think it's just something people are fundamentally interested in," committee Chairman Andrew Overbeck said last week.

A formal Community Mobility Plan developed by city officials is not in the cards for Clintonville until after 2018 at the earliest, due to lack of funding, former Department of Development Director Mark Kelsey informed area commission members by letter in August, just prior to retiring from the post.

That doesn't mean members of the community can't step in and come up with ideas of their own, Overbeck said.

One of the goals of the meeting is to gather suggestions and begin to develop consensus in the community for transportation upgrades and other mobility improvements that might be made during the next round of Urban Infrastructure Recovery grants to neighborhoods, he said.

Clintonville received $475,000 out of a total of $6.8 million in infrastructure grants last spring. The money was earmarked for six projects in the neighborhood, including new brick crosswalks and planted medians.

The second goal of the Dec. 3 open house, Overbeck said, is to hear from residents about larger-scale projects, such as adding sidewalks in parts of Clintonville that lack them.

"We're looking for big ideas, too, but really focusing on the implementable things," he said.

The meeting will not feature any presentations, but instead will have stations set up on various topics where those interested may offer suggestions and ideas.

"Show us where the problem areas are, show us where the issues are," Overbeck said. "People will come in when they've got 30 minutes to give us their ideas."

Committee members will spend some time reviewing the results of the open house, the chairman said, and then by late winter or early spring come before the CAC or hold another public session to discuss possible recommendations.

"In any case, there will be another kind of chance for people to weigh in," Overbeck added.