When former Olentangy High School baseball standout Ryan Meade arrived on the Ohio State campus last fall, it didn't take long for him to realize just how much his life was about to change.

When former Olentangy High School baseball standout Ryan Meade arrived on the Ohio State campus last fall, it didn't take long for him to realize just how much his life was about to change.

After helping the Braves reach the Division I state championship game in 2006, Meade, who twice was first-team all-state, knew it would take a solid showing in fall camp to see playing time as a true freshman for the Buckeyes.

"When you say adjustments, it was definitely tough," he said. "It was all kinds of stuff from changing my swing to trying to get used to the pitching. The game is a lot quicker and the preseason workouts were 20 times more in-depth than high school."

It's the swing part that's been especially tough for the infielder, who hit .537 with eight home runs and 40 RBI as a senior and left Olentangy with a .478 career average, 15 home runs and 101 RBI.

Meade impressed Ohio State coach Bob Todd enough to start in 40 games this spring, which included a 16-game hitting streak. He batted .314 with six doubles, a triple, a home run and 28 RBI as the young Buckeyes finished 30-26 overall and 15-15 in the Big Ten.

But after his streak came to an end, coaches decided it was time to make the change.

It has become his homework assignment for the summer while using a wooden bat with the Delaware Cows in the Great Lakes Summer Collegiate League after debating an opportunity to leave home for the Northwoods League in Canada.

Through 12 games, he was batting .250 with a double a two RBI.

"They changed my swing two or three times this spring so I've just been trying to figure out what I'm going to do now," Meade said. "I used to have my hands like Gary Sheffield and I would wiggle the bat. I'm trying to get more set at the plate and keep my hands higher."

Cows coach Dave Koblentz, whose team last Tuesday wrapped up a stretch of 12 games in 10 days at 6-5-1 overall before last Friday's game against visiting Xenia, has been watching Meade play since he was a junior at Olentangy. He sees plenty of potential and a "very, very big upside."

"Right now, we're in the situation where he needs to use the whole field," Koblentz said. "He has the tendency to want to jerk everything. But he's got bat speed. I remember watching him play in high school and saying it was one of the quickest bats I'd ever seen for a high school kid."

Meade hopes his work this summer will earn him a permanent spot in the Buckeyes' starting lineup at third base or left field. Coaches also have taken note of his 6-foot-2, 190-pound frame and strong arm that could be of use on the mound. Meade, a right-hander, was 14-3 with a 1.60 ERA at Olentangy.

"I've really just been focused on working on my swing, but I have a buddy who catches me at the high school," Meade said. "It's been good to just stay in the flow of the game so you're not taking time off. For me, it's all about getting ready for next season."