As the National Anthem comes to an end at Ohio Wesleyan's Littick Field, Jamel Scott usually heads for his spot in center field. On the way, he replicates the signature flip made famous by Hall of Fame shortstop Ozzie Smith.

As the National Anthem comes to an end at Ohio Wesleyan's Littick Field, Jamel Scott usually heads for his spot in center field. On the way, he replicates the signature flip made famous by Hall of Fame shortstop Ozzie Smith.

His teammates on the Delaware Cows baseball team love the enthusiasm.

"He's just a tremendous personality to have in the dugout," coach Dave Koblentz said. "He's always got a smile on his face. The guys love him and you can tell he just likes being around his teammates. You never see him down."

It's an approach that made Scott popular at Dublin Scioto High School and, now, the University of Cincinnati, where this spring he wrapped up his sophomore season ranked second in the Big East in steals (35) behind teammate Tony Campana (45). Not only that, he posted a career-best 17-game hit streak that ended in the Big East championship game.

This month, he's vaulted to near the top of the Cows batting statistics at .278 with two doubles, a triple and five stolen bases after opening the summer season below the .200 mark at the plate.

Delaware before last Wednesday was 16-13-1 overall in the Great Lakes Summer Collegiate League behind first place Cincinnati (25-7) and Stark County (18-12).

The top six teams make the playoffs Aug. 5-8.

"I think I was trying to get adjusted with the wood bat, and maybe my timing was off a little bit, but I'm back in my comfort zone and having fun," Scott said. "The wood bat is such a big difference. With aluminum, you can get away with hitting the ball off the handle. You do that with a wood bat and you get a slow roller to shortstop."

Scott, at 5-foot-4, has been trying to use his height as a benefit at the plate. He bats anywhere from leadoff to second or seventh in the lineup.

"I've really been trying to work the pitch count and use my size," he said. "As I get older, I think my baseball IQ is going up, but I really have to learn how to work the pitcher and draw some walks."

But the biggest change for Scott hasn't come at the plate. Last offseason, Cincinnati coach Brian Cleary asked him to move from infield to left field. It's where Scott played for the majority of the season.

"In center field, his angles are extremely good and surprisingly he has a strong arm," Koblentz said. "At the plate, I think he's reading his pitches better. He can bunt, so teams have to come in on the corners and that can create some holes."

For the Bearcats, Scott was one of five players to hit better than .300 at .311. He recorded 22 multiple-hit games and stole two bases in eight games.

At Scioto, Scott was first-team all-state in Division I as a senior and three times was all-league. He was all-league twice in football.

He spent last summer with the Cows, but played in only nine games after injuring a wrist.

He's always happy to be home for a short time.

"It's always good to get in that extra family time since you're away at school for nine months," Scott said. "A lot of nights, I'm just hanging with my brothers and family."