The Delaware city budget proposal that would have cut four full-time and two part-time workers has been amended to eliminate only two full-time workers and one part-time -- at least for now.

The Delaware city budget proposal that would have cut four full-time and two part-time workers has been amended to eliminate only two full-time workers and one part-time -- at least for now.

City council approved the modified budget Dec. 22.

Delaware City Manager Tom Homan called this year's budget process "difficult" given the current economy and thanked the council for the "time and effort" they put in to ensure city services were maintained while making some hard decisions to keep expenditures in line with revenues.

Revenues for 2009 are expected to total $22,560,887, according to finance director Dean Stelzer, while expenditures approved unanimously by the council for next year total $22,383,185.

The excess funds will be added to the city's cash reserves, he said, bringing that fund to nearly $3.5-million, a little over 15 percent of the city's annual expenditures.

"I'm pleased that we passed a budget that's balanced," said Councilman Andrew Brush. Last year, Brush said he voted against the budget because "I felt we were heading into a recession."

The budget passed by the council for 2009 "is a responsible way (to fund city operations) given the economic challenges the city of Delaware and the rest of the country face," he said.

The budget preserves the jobs of a full-time mechanic in the public works department and a zoning technician in the planning department, as well as a part-time information technology technician.

All three positions are needed to maintain current services, Homan said, and "probably" would not have been on the chopping block if he had known that expected revenue for 2009 is slightly higher than it was when he first presented his proposed budget to the council in November.

The budget eliminates two positions now filled by full-time employee: an administrative assistant in the planning department, and a wastewater manager from the public utilities department, and a part-time police parking control officer. It eliminates six full-time positions which now are vacant: a code enforcement inspector in the city's planning department, a project manager in the engineering department, a tech worker in the public works department, a grounds and facilities director in the parks and recreation department, and a deputy utilities director and tech employee in the public utilities department.

It also cuts five interns and reduces seasonal hours in several departments.

"The issue really is the level of service. There's always going to be a question on the level of service," Homan said. "I recognize that and we can manage with what was recommended (in the original budget). It is a city council decision."

He did tell the council that the saved positions could still be eliminated if revenues come in lower than expected.