A bus shelter in Delaware will be erected on East Winter Street, outside the county library, if it is approved by city council.

A bus shelter in Delaware will be erected on East Winter Street, outside the county library, if it is approved by city council.

The city's historic preservation commission approved the bus shelter at its Aug. 26 meeting. The issue will go to council next month for final approval. The city's parking and safety committee also has approved the project.

The bus stop will be the first for the Delaware Area Transit Agency (DATA), said its executive director, Denny Schooley.

DATA has three fixed routes that operate weekdays. The library stop is on the "blue" route.

The shelter is needed to give riders a place to get out of the elements without going into the library, he told the commission. The $7,200 cost will be paid out of federal stimulus funds DATA received.

DATA originally wanted to locate the shelter on Henry Street but there was a problem with disability access, Schooley said.

Two on-street parking spaces will be eliminated on East Winter Street in front of the 5 foot by 10 foot shelter. Commission member Tom King asked Schooley about parking for those riding the bus, given the shortage of parking at the library.

Schooley said he was aware of the parking issues at the library but that the bus stop at that location has "proven to be more of a pedestrian access. ... I don't anticipate a lot of parking will be needed."

The shelter will have an aluminum frame, which will be dark bronze anodized to fit into the historical feel of the area, with clear polycarbonate glazing. The commission will allow a bench inside and a DATA map, no larger than three feet by three feet. It will be anchored onto the sidewalk at the curb, leaving enough room for pedestrians. No street trees will be removed, said Jason Bechtold, city development planner.

The roof of the shelter will be modified to include a seam gable roof, more in character with the roof of the library, he said.

Commissioner Joe Coleman agreed the design would fit into that area, which is on the fringe of the historic district. He said he doesn't want it to be a "template for others in the historic district."

If other shelters are planned in the future, each needs to be considered "on a case-by-case basis," he said.

The commission also expressed concern about the shelter's upkeep. Schooley assured them that DATA would keep the shelter clean and maintain it as needed.

"We would not allow the shelter to sit dirty. ... We want a good public image," he said.