Those visiting Sunbury's town hall and municipal building starting June 1 will see some history on display.

Those visiting Sunbury's town hall and municipal building starting June 1 will see some history on display.

The village of Sunbury will display two architectural drawings from the Sunbury Co-Operative Creamery. The drawings, both dated 1918, were donated to the village by Sunbury resident Terry Fravel.

Fravel worked for 30 years at the Nestle plant, where the creamery was originally housed. He had been given the drawings by the plant manager when Nestle shut down, and had kept them in his house. The framed two-foot by three-foot drawings had been hanging in the engineer's office at the plant since about 1980, when they were discovered in storage.

"He knew that I would take care of them," Fravel said, saying that he had kept them at his house "to protect them, more than anything else." Fravel contacted the village to see if anyone was interested in displaying them.

Village council president Tommy Hatfield said he appreciates that Fravel made the drawings available to the village.

"It's nice to have those kind of pictures available to keep for historical reference," Hatfield said.

According to the Big Walnut Area Historical Society's website, a group of farmers and businessmen organized the Sunbury Co-Operative Creamery in 1892. At stations in Center Village, Kilbourne, Cheshire, Marengo and Condit, cream was separated and delivered by horse and wagon to the Sunbury plant, where it was made into butter and cheese.

The Sunbury plant produced 500 pounds of butter each day, sold for 25 cents a pound. The butter was shipped all over the country. In 1918, the creamery was sold to John Wildi Evaporated Milk Co., and a year later the company consolidated with Nestle.