Delaware City Council on March 26 unanimously approved a plan that will create a permanent home for the Delaware chapter of Family Promise, a national nonprofit whose mission is to help homeless and low-income families achieve sustainable independent housing.

Delaware City Council on March 26 unanimously approved a plan that will create a permanent home for the Delaware chapter of Family Promise, a national nonprofit whose mission is to help homeless and low-income families achieve sustainable independent housing.

Family Promise and its partner, Habitat for Humanity, want to rehabilitate the abandoned house at 39 N. Washington St., which has been an eyesore in the neighborhood for several years, according to city planner David Efland.

"It's a big building on a small lot and it's in disrepair," Efland said. "Family Promise and Habitat have brokered an exchange from the current owner and will restore it to productive use."

Charlton Amidon, vice president of the Northwest Neighborhood Association, told council his group "has had several discussions about Family Promise and its plans for the building at 39 N. Washington St. and we're all on board for this project. I haven't heard a single negative thing about it."

Councilman Andrew Brush concurred: "The building is in my district and we've received numerous complaints about it over the years. Now all I'm getting is positive feedback."

The house has five bedrooms and three bathrooms. Extensive interior improvements will include the addition of a communal kitchen, a common open space and offices for both the executive director, Jennifer Sami, and social worker Tonia Wilson.

In other council business:

• Barley Hopsters, 43 N. Sandusky St., was approved for a D-5 liquor license.

The store, which specializes in craft beers and beer-making supplies, will now be able to add beer tastings to its repertoire.

"We had a license to do wine tastings but 75 percent of our business is in beer," said operating partner Bill Denen. "Now we can do beer tastings on premises and hold special events."

Denen said the D-5 designation will "allow me to get on the phone with, say, the Elevator Brewery (in Columbus) and ask them to bring some of their beers here for a tasting.

"It's one thing to explain to a customer what a beer is like and it's something entirely different when they can actually taste the beer," Denen said.

Another benefit of the tasting license is that "A lot of brewers make beer on a micro scale. Their more complex beers are expensive to make. These beers are available as draft only and not in the bottle. Our customers haven't been able to taste those beers until now."

• Council authorized the issuance of up to $13.4 million in notes "in anticipation of the issuance of bonds" to pay for work on Glenn Road, an addition to the Justice Center and as new technology equipment for the city (hardware, software, switching equipment and fiber optic infrastructure) and to acquire "certain real property" to be used by city entities.