Wendy's employees and executives -- and officials in Dublin -- are in a wait and see mode after the April 24 announcement that the fast-food chain had agreed to be sold to Arby's parent company, Triarc Cos.

Wendy's employees and executives -- and officials in Dublin -- are in a wait and see mode after the April 24 announcement that the fast-food chain had agreed to be sold to Arby's parent company, Triarc Cos.

The transaction, which requires the approval of both companies' shareholders, came after more than a year of discussion by executives and potential buyers about strategic options for Wendy's, including the possible sale or merger with another company.

Although no specifics have been announced, layoffs are expected, according to Triarc.

Wendy's employs more than 550 people at its headquarters, 4288 W. Dublin-Granville Road.

The company is one of the top 15 employers in Dublin, said deputy city manger and finance director Marsha Grigsby.

When asked if he knew any details about potential layoffs, Wendy's spokesman Denny Lynch didn't reveal much.

"In the news release it was implied," he said. "I don't have anything more than what the news release says."

The release states Wendy's will continue to be headquartered in Dublin and Triarc in Atlanta, but that a consolidated support center will be based in Atlanta to oversee all the public company's responsibilities and other central service functions at a savings of $60-million.

Wendy's held a meeting with its employees shortly after the news was made public. Lynch said people reacted as expected.

"They need to understand what that means for them," he said. "The announcement of the transaction was made and the details will get worked out in the process. A lot of the questions will be answered as we go down this path. (There are) a lot of questions I don't have answers to today. There will definitely be answers, but I just don't have them today."

Triarc's chief executive officer, Roland Smith, will take on the same role for Wendy's. However, Lynch was adamant that Kerrii Anderson will remain in her role as CEO until the transaction is complete.

The transaction is expected to be completed within the next six months, Lynch said.

In the meantime, the Dublin business community remains in a holding pattern as well.

"I think right now we're not really sure what all this means at this point," said deputy city manger and economic development director Dana McDaniel. "It's really too early to tell. "I think there have been some statements that certain operations will remain here," McDaniel said. "I think whenever you have a corporate merger like this there's always a chance certain functions could be consolidated. Where they would be is unknown."

City Manager Jane Brautigam was unable to be reached for comment because she is out of town.

Wendy's was founded in 1969 by Dave Thomas and is headquartered on more than 40 acres in Dublin. It has 110 restaurants in central Ohio and 6,600 internationally, with about 30 employees per location.

"Wendy's has certainly been an icon in the community and integrated into the fabric of Dublin," McDaniel said. "It's certainly something we'd like to remain in our community.

Whatever the outcome of the ownership situation is, we'll reach out to them and let them know we're willing to work with them and we want them to stay as part of our community."

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